Cal/OSHA Resources: Window Cleaning Regulations

Window cleaning regulations for buildings built after 1974 that are under 130 feet in height.

ARTICLE 5.WINDOW CLEANING

3281.Definitions – Title 8, Article 5.Window Cleaning

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(a) For the purpose of Articles 5 and 6, certain terms are defined as follows, except for Appendix D:

Anchor. The fitting, fastened to the window frame or wall, to which the belt terminal is attached.

Anchor, double head. An anchor having two heads.

Anchor, single head. An anchor having one head.

Anchorage. A secure point of attachment for safety lines, lanyards or deceleration devices, and which is independent of the means of supporting or suspending the employee.

Anemometer. An instrument for measuring wind velocity.

Angulated Roping. A suspension method where the upper point of suspension is inboard from the attachments on the suspended unit, thus causing the suspended unit to bear against the face of the building.

Belt Terminal. That part of the window cleaner’s safety belt which is fastened to the terminal strap to be attached to the anchor during the operation of window cleaning.

Belts, Window Cleaner’s. The equipment meeting the requirements of Section 3284, attached to the body of the window cleaner while cleaning windows and shall include the terminal straps.

Buckle. Any device for holding the body belt and body harness closed around the wearer’s body.

Buckle, Friction. Single Pass, Fixed Bar. A buckle which maintains its position on the webbing by means of a single pass of the webbing over the fixed center bar.

Buckle, Friction. Single Pass, Sliding Bar. A buckle which maintains its position on the webbing by means of a single looping of the webbing over the sliding center bar.

Buckle, Friction. Double Pass. A buckle which maintains its position on the webbing by friction and requires a double pass of the webbing over the center bar.

Buckle, Tongue. A buckle which depends upon a tongue passed through holes in the webbing or strength member of the belt to maintain its position.

Building. Any building or structure more than one story in height or having window sills more than 12 feet above grade, which is a place of employment.

Building Engineer of Record. A civil or structural engineer that designed the building or structure or the referenced portion of the building or structure.

Building Face Roller. A rotating cylindrical member designed to ride on the face of the building wall to prevent the platform from abrading the face of the building and to assist in stabilizing the platform.

Building Maintenance. Operations such as window cleaning, caulking, metal polishing, reglazing, and general maintenance on building surfaces.

Building Official. Any state, county, city or local building inspector.

Cable. A conductor, or group of conductors, enclosed in a weatherproof sheath, that may be used to supply electrical power and/or control current for equipment or to provide voice communication circuits.

Carriage. A wheeled vehicle used for the horizontal movement and support of other equipment.

Certification. A written, signed and dated statement confirming the performance of a requirement of this orders.

Combination Cable. A cable having both steel structural members capable of supporting the platform, and copper or other electrical conductors insulated from each other and the structural members by nonconductive barriers.

Competent Person. One who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings or working conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to employees, and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them.

Connector. A device which is used to couple (connect) parts of the system together. It may be an independent component of the system (such as a carabineer), or an integral component of part of system (such as a buckle or dee-ring sewn into a body belt or body harness, or a snap-hook spliced or sewn to a lanyard or self-retracting lanyard).

Continuous Pressure. The need for constant manual actuation for a control to function.

Control. A mechanism used to regulate or guide the operation of the equipment.

Controlled Descent Apparatus (CDA). A CDA is a device used by window cleaners to achieve a controlled descent during window cleaning operations. The descent control capability of the CDA is derived by frictional forces developed when a line(s) passes over and/or around and/or through fixed members of the friction device designed to be readily controlled by the window cleaner.

Danger Zone. The “Danger Zone” is the area within six feet of the edge of a building’s roof or protruding ledge. This area is only considered a “Danger Zone” if the roof or protruding ledge is not provided with a guardrail that stands 42 inches in height, a 42 inch high parapet, or a combination thereof.

Davit. A device, used singularly or in pairs, for suspending a powered platform from work, storage and rigging locations on the building being serviced. Unlike outriggers, a davit reacts its operating load into a single roof socket or carriage attachment.

Davit, Fixed. A davit designed to remain at a fixed location.

Davit, Ground Rigged. A davit which cannot be used to raise a suspended working platform above the building face being serviced.

Davit, Mobile. A davit designed to be used in association with a roof car.

Davit, Portable. A davit designed and dedicated for a specific building or roof area, capable of being moved manually from work location to work location within the dedicated area.

Davit, Roof Rigged. A davit used to raise the suspended working platform above the building face being serviced. This type of davit can also be used to raise a suspended working platform which has been ground-rigged.

Davit Socket, Pivoted. An anchoring device that pivots inboard from the building face and transfers loads imposed by the davit to the roof structure or parapet.

Davit, Transportable. A davit designed to be structurally compatible with and capable of being moved from building to building or worksite (geographical area) to worksite.

Deceleration Device. A mechanism, such as a rope grab, ripstitch lanyard, specially woven lanyard, tearing or deforming lanyard, or automatic self retracting-safety line/lanyard, which serves to dissipate a substantial amount of energy during a fall arrest, or otherwise limits the energy imposed on an employee during fall arrest.

Deceleration Distance. The additional vertical distance a falling employee travels, excluding safety line elongation and free fall distance, before stopping, from the point at which the deceleration device begins to operate. It is measured as the distance between the location of an employee’s body belt or body harness attachment point at the moment of activation (at the onset of fall arrest forces) of the deceleration device during a fall, and the location of that attachment point after the employee comes to a full stop.

Equivalent. Alternative design, material or method that is acceptable to the Division and which the employer can demonstrate will provide an equal or greater degree of safety for employees than the method, material or design specified in the standard.

Extension Device. A hand tool used to perform window cleaning on surfaces beyond the normal reach of the window cleaner.

Free Fall. The act of falling before the personal fall arrest system begins to apply force to arrest the fall.

Free Fall Distance. The vertical displacement of the fall arrest attachment point on the employee’s body belt or body harness between onset of the fall and just before the system begins to apply force to arrest the fall. This distance excludes deceleration distance, safety line and lanyard elongation but includes any deceleration device slide distance or self-retracting safety line/lanyard extension before they operate and fall arrest forces occur.

From the Inside. From a position in which all of the window cleaner’s body except one arm and shoulder shall be on the interior side of the line of the window frame and with both feet on the floor.

From the Outside. From a position in which more of the window cleaner’s body than one arm and shoulder is outside of the line of the window frame.

Grade. The ground, floor, sidewalk, roof, or any other approximately level solid surface of sufficient area and having sufficient structural strength to be considered as a safe place to work.

Ground Rigging. A method of suspending a working platform starting from grade to a point of suspension above grade.

Guide Button. A building face anchor designed to engage a guide track mounted on a platform.

Guide Roller. A rotating cylindrical member, operating separately or as part of a guide assembly, designed to provide continuous engagement between the platform and the building guides or guideways.

Guide Shoe. A device attached to the platform designed to provide a sliding contact between the platform and the building guides.

Height of Suspension. Where the term height of suspension is used in Articles 5 and 6 of these Orders, it refers to the specific suspension height on buildings or structures to the level below. To determine the suspension height, the distance is measured from the highest point of suspension for the building maintenance equipment (outrigger beam, davit, or roof carriage) to the level below. If the building maintenance equipment is suspended from roof tie-backs, the highest point is measured from the top of the parapet or roof’s edge. The lowest measurement point at the level or ground below includes, but is not limited to, roofs, sidewalks, streets, parking garages, and driveways.

Hoisting Machine. A device intended to raise and lower a suspended or supported unit.

Hoist Rated Load. The hoist manufacturer’s maximum allowable operating load.

Installation. All the equipment and affected parts of a building which are associated with the performance of building maintenance using powered platforms.

Interlock. A device designed to ensure that operations or motions occur in proper sequence.

Intermittent Stabilization. A method of platform stabilization in which the angulated suspension wire rope(s) are secured to regularly spaced building anchors to assure that the platform continuously bears against the building within predetermined limits.

Lanyard. A flexible length of rope, wire rope, or strap which is used to secure the body belt or body harness to a deceleration device, lifeline, or anchorage.

Lifeline. A flexible line for connection to an anchorage at one end to hang vertically (vertical lifeline), or for connection to anchorage at both ends to stretch horizontally (horizontal lifeline), and which serves as a means for connecting other components to a personal fall arrest system to the anchorage.

Live Load. The total static weight of workers, tools, parts, and supplies that the equipment is designed to support.

Machine Screw or Bolt. A screw or bolt used to install anchors on metal window frames or sections.

Manual Boatswain’s Chair. A seat for one person, suspended by a single line or tackle, which is designed to be raised and lowered by the user.

Obstruction Detector. A control that will stop the suspended or supported unit in the direction of travel if an obstruction is encountered, and will allow the unit to move only in a direction away from the obstruction.

Operating Control. A mechanism regulating or guiding the operation of equipment that ensures a specific operating mode.

Operating Device. A device actuated manually to activate a control.

Outrigger Beam. A device, used singularly or in pairs, for suspending a working platform from work, storage, and rigging locations on the building being serviced. Unlike davits, an outrigger reacts its operating moment load as at least two opposing vertical components acting into two or more distinct roof points and/or attachments.

Outrigger Beam, Fixed. An outrigger beam designed to remain at a fixed location.

Outrigger Beam, Mobile. An outrigger beam designed to be used in association with a roof car.

Outrigger Beam, Portable. An outrigger beam designed and dedicated to a specific building or roof area, which is capable of being moved from work location to work location within the dedicated area.

Outrigger Beam, Transportable. An outrigger beam designed to be moved manually from building to building or worksite (geographical area) to worksite.

Personal Fall Arrest System. A system used to arrest an employee in a fall from a working level. It consists of: an anchorage, connectors, a body harness and may include a lanyard, deceleration device, safety line, or suitable combinations of these.

Platform Rated Load. The combined weight of workers, tools, equipment and other material which is permitted to be carried by the working platform at the installation, as stated on the load rating plate.

Poured Socket. The method of providing wire rope terminations in which the ends of the rope are held in a tapered socket by means of poured spelter or resins.

Primary Brake. A brake designed to be applied automatically whenever power to the prime mover is interrupted or discontinued.

Prime Mover. The source of mechanical power for as machine.

Rated Load. The manufacturer’s recommended maximum load.

Rated Strength. The strength of wire rope, as designated by its manufacturer or vendor, based on standard testing procedures or acceptable engineering design practices.

Rated Working Load. The combined static weight of workers, materials, and suspended or supported equipment.

Roof Powered Platform. A working platform where the hoist(s) used to raise or lower the platform is located on the roof.

Rope. The equipment used to suspend a component of an equipment installation, i.e., wire rope.

Rope Grab. A deceleration device which travels on a safety line and automatically frictionally engages the safety line and locks so as to arrest the fall of an employee. A rope grab usually employs the principle of inertial locking, cam/lever locking, or both.

Safe Manner. The term means the use of any of the following methods of window cleaning in which the window cleaner is protected in accordance with these orders when:

  • Standing on the sill.
  • Working from a ladder.
  • Working from a scaffold work platform.
  • Working from a boatswain’s chair.
  • Working from a safe surface.

Safe Surface. A horizontal surface intended to be occupied by employees, which is so protected by a fall protection system that it can be reasonably assured that said occupants will be protected against falls.

Safety Belt or Harness. A device used specifically for securing a worker from the hazard of falls from elevated work areas and include:

Body Belt. A strap with means both for securing it about the waist and for attaching it to a lanyard, safety line, or deceleration device.

Body Harness. A design of simple or compound straps which may be secured about the wearer in a manner to distribute the fall arrest forces over at least the thighs, pelvis, waist, chest and shoulders with means for attaching it to other components of a personal fall arrest system.

Safety Device. (Approved). (See Section 3206 of the General Industry Safety Orders.)

Safety Factor. The ratio of the nominal strength to the nominal design load.

Safety Line. A component consisting of a flexible line for connection to an anchorage at one end to hang vertically (vertical safety line), or for connection to anchorages at both ends to stretch horizontally (horizontal safety line) and which serves as a means for connecting other components of a personal fall arrest system to the anchorage.

Scaffold. The complete scaffold structure including the work platform and all supporting members.

Scaffold, Rolling. A fixed-height or extensible self-supporting scaffold that can be manually moved into place.

Scaffold, Suspended, Manually Operated (Swinging Stage). A scaffold suspended from above by wire or fiber ropes and rigged with manually operated pulley blocks or hoists or equivalent means so that the work platform elevation is easily adjustable. Such scaffold is not designed for use on a specific structure or group of structures.

Scaffold, Suspended, Permanent. A scaffold that is designed for a specific building and is used on that building only.

Scaffold, Suspended, Power Driven. Permanent or transportable suspended scaffolds equipped with one or more power units (not manually powered) for raising or lowering the scaffold platform.

Scaffold, Suspended, Transportable. A powered or manually operated work platform that is brought to a work site for the purpose of performing maintenance or other work that by nature is of short duration.

Secondary Brake. A brake designed to arrest the descent of the suspended or supported equipment in the event of an overspeed condition.

Self-Powered Platform. A working platform where the hoist(s) used to raise or lower the platform is mounted on the platform.

Self-Retracting Safety Line/Lanyard. A deceleration device which contains a drum-wound line which may be slowly extracted from, or retracted onto, the drum under slight tension during normal employee movement, and which, after onset of a fall, automatically locks the drum and arrests the fall.

Sill. A surface that is part of the building or structure, immediately below the window, and of sufficient width and design to safely support window cleaners and their equipment.

Snap-Hook. A connector comprised of a hookshaped member with a normally closed keeper, or similar arrangement, which may be opened to permit the hook to receive an object and, when released, automatically closes to retain the object. Snap-hooks are generally one of two types:

  1. The locking type (double-acting) with a self-closing, self-locking keeper which remains closed and locked until unlocked and pressed open for connection or disconnection, or
  2. The non-locking type with a self-closing keeper which remains closed until pressed open for connection or disconnection.

Speed Reducer. A positive type speed reducing machine.

Stability Factor. The ratio of the stabilizing moment to the overturning moment.

Stabilizer Tie. A flexible line connecting the building anchor and the suspension wire rope supporting the platform.

Supported Equipment. Building maintenance equipment that is held or moved to its working position by means of attachment directly to the building or extensions of the building being maintained.

Suspended Equipment. Building maintenance equipment that is suspended and raised or lowered to its working position by means of ropes or combination cables attached to some anchorage above the equipment.

Tail Line. The nonsupporting end of the wire rope used to suspend the platform.

Terminal Strap (Runner). The portion of a window cleaner’s belt that attaches the terminals to the belt’s waist band.

Tie-in Guides. The portion of a building that provides continuous positive engagement between the building and a suspended or supported unit during its travel on the face of the building.

Tie-off (Tieing-off). The act of an employee, wearing personal fall protection equipment, connecting directly or indirectly to an anchorage. It also means the condition of an employee being connected to an anchorage.

Traction Hoist. A type of hoisting machine that does not accumulate the suspension wire rope on the hoisting drum or sheave, and is designed to raise and lower a suspended load by the application of friction forces between the suspension wire rope and the drum or sheave.

Trolley Carriage. A carriage suspended from an overhead track structure.

Verified. Accepted by design, evaluation, or inspection by a professional engineer currently registered in the State of California.

Waist Band. That part of the window cleaner’s belt which is attached to the body of the window cleaner. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8501.)

Weatherproof. So constructed that exposure to adverse weather conditions will not affect or interfere with the proper use or functions of the equipment or component.

Winding Drum Hoist. A type of hoisting machine that accumulates the suspension wire rope on the hoisting drum.

Working Platform. Suspended or supported equipment intended to provide access to the face of a building and occupied by persons engaged in building maintenance.

Wrap. One complete turn of the suspension wire rope around the surface of a hoist drum. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8501.)

NOTE

Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code.

HISTORY
  1. New Article 5 (Sections 3281-3292) filed 6-20-75; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 75, No. 25). Window Cleaning Safety Orders formerly in Subchapter 21 (Sections 8700-8722). See Registers 26, No. 6 and 55, No. 13.
  2. Amendment filed 7-16-76; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 76, No. 29).
  3. Amendment of subsections (a)(19) and (a)(22) filed 10-29-80; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 80, No. 44).
  4. Editorial correction filed 10-7-83; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 83, No. 41).
  5. Amendment filed 9-12-85; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 85, No. 37).
  6. Amendment filed 3-9-93; operative 4-8-93 (Register 93, No. 11).
  7. Amendment of definition of “Lanyard” and new definition of “Lifeline” filed 4-4-96; operative 5-4-96 (Register 96, No. 14).
  8. New definitions of “Controlled Descent Apparatus (CDA),” “Danger Zone” and “Height of Suspension,” and amendment of former definition of “Boatswain’s Chair” to new definition of “Manual Boatswain’s Chair” filed 7-23-98; operative 8-22-98 (Register 98, No. 30).9. New definitions of “Competent Person” and “Terminal Strap (Runner)” and amendment of definition of “Personal Fall Arrest System” filed 3-31-2000; operative 4-30-2000 (Register 2000, No. 13).

 

3282.General Requirements for All Window Cleaning Operations – Title 8, Article 5.Window Cleaning

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Scope. This Article establishes safety requirements for the cleaning of all windows of all buildings. Window cleaning includes operation(s) of washing, wiping or other methods of cleaning windows, window frames, curtain wall components, building panels, etc.

NOTE: It is recognized because of special site conditions that certain provisions in Article 6 may be applicable and can be used in conjunction with equipment and/or practices in this article.

(a) Windows shall not to be cleaned from the outside or inside unless means are provided to enable such work to be done in a safe manner as provided in these orders.

(b) Provisions for preventing accidents due to overhead high voltage lines shall be in conformance with the High Voltage Electrical Safety Orders, Article 37.

(c) Employers shall provide their window cleaning employees with safety equipment and devices conforming with the requirements of these orders, and shall maintain such equipment in safe condition at all times.

(d) Employers shall instruct their window cleaning employees in the proper use of all equipment provided to them, and shall supervise the use of the equipment and safety devices to insure that safe working practices are observed.

(e) All employees cleaning windows shall use safety devices and equipment as required herein.

(f) Only employees who have been properly trained to handle such equipment shall be assigned to work from scaffolds or boatswain’s chairs.

(g) (1) In every building where window cleaning operations are performed in such a manner that a person stands on the sill in order to clean the window or works from the inside where the window opening is of such size that it would be possible to fall through the open window to the outside, there shall be installed window cleaning safety anchors or other anchorages approved by the Division. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8502(a).)

(2) Any window which when fully opened has a clear opening with the lesser dimension exceeding 18 inches, or any window in which the height to width relationship presents a hazard, shall be considered as presenting the hazard of falling through as specified in Section 3282(g)(1) above. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8502(a)2.)

(3) In every building other than those described in Section 3282(g)(1), provisions shall be made for window cleaning by use of elevating platforms, rolling scaffolds, suspended scaffolds, boatswain’s chairs, or ladders, as specified in these orders. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8502(a)1.)

(h) Lag screws shall not be used in new or replacement installations. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8502(b).)

(i) All glass draft deflectors shall be free of sharp edges that could cut workers removing deflectors in connection with the window cleaning operations.

(j) Safety equipment, scaffolds and their components shall not be used with acids or other corrosive substances, or in corrosive atmospheres except when adequate precautions are taken to protect the scaffold from damage in accordance with recommendations of the corrosive substance manufacturer and the scaffold manufacturer.

(k) Special precautions shall be taken by the user to protect scaffold members, including any wire, fiber, or synthetic rope, when a heat-producing process is in use. Ropes that have been contacted by the heat-producing process shall be considered to be permanently damaged and shall not be used for scaffold support.

(l) Window cleaners shall not pass from one window sill to another window sill on the outside of a building unless one belt terminal is connected at all times.

(m) Window cleaners shall not be permitted to work from any sill on which there is any obstruction or a slippery substance that might impair their footing.

(n) Washing from the sill shall not be permitted unless there is a certain minimum standing room on the sill in relation to its slope. Permissible sill width and slope combinations are shown in Fig. 1.

Figure 1 –

SLOPE OF STILL OR SURFACE (DEGREES BELOW HORIZONTAL)

The chart above shows the relationship between minimum permissible sill widths and various sill slopes for washing windows from a standing position on the sill. If the point of intersection of a vertical line from the slope value with a horizontal line from the sill width value falls in the unshaded area, washing windows from a standing position on the sill is permissible. It is not permissible if the intersection falls anywhere in the shaded area.

(o) No employee shall be permitted to work from, stand or walk on any surface that is not rated for such live loading by the building’s engineer of record and/or a building official. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8502(c))

(p)(1)(A) Building owners shall provide the employer written assurance, before use, that all their building’s safety devices and equipment meet the provisions of these orders. The written assurance shall consider, but not be limited to: window anchors and fittings; load sustaining capabilities of platforms, building components, hoisting and supporting equipment; stability factors for carriages, platforms and supporting equipment; maximum horizontal force for movement of carriages and davits; design of carriages, hoisting machines, wire rope and stabilization systems; and design criteria for electrical wiring and equipment.

(B) All safety devices and equipment considered in the written assurance shall be inspected at least every 12 months. All safety devices and parts of such equipment, including related building support structures, shall be inspected and where necessary, tested to determine if they are safe to use or operate. All such tests shall be conducted as required in Section 3296(b).

(C) 1. Owners of buildings 36 feet or more in height shall have an Operating Procedures Outline Sheet (OPOS) where one or more of the following conditions apply to such buildings:

  1. A building does not have established window cleaning system or procedures meeting the requirements specified in Articles 5 and 6, or
  2. A building’s original window cleaning procedures prepared in accordance with the requirements in Articles 5 and 6 have been changed because of building modifications, or
  3. A building has extreme architectural features, which require the use of complex rigging or equipment, or a building that uses rigging or equipment not covered by these Orders.
  4. An OPOS shall be developed by a person(s) with knowledge in the design, installation and use of building maintenance equipment (i.e. possessing Scaffold Inspection Testing certification as specified in Section 3296). The OPOS shall be written in manner that can be readily understood by employers. An OPOS that requires structural modifications to the building or existing building maintenance equipment shall have such modifications designed by a mechanical, structural or civil engineer currently registered in the State of California with experience in the design and installation of such equipment.
  5. An OPOS shall be developed which at a minimum shall contain the elements of Appendix A of this Article.

(2) Employers shall not permit their employees to use any building safety devices or equipment prior to receiving copies of the written assurance and, if required, an OPOS from the building owner as required by Section 3282(p)(1)(A) and (C) above.

NOTE: Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code; and Section 18943(c), Health and Safety Code.

HISTORY
  1. Amendment filed 7-16-76; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 76, No. 29).
  2. Editorial correction filed 10-7-83; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 83, No. 41).
  3. Amendment filed 9-12-85; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 85, No. 37).
  4. Amendment filed 3-9-93; operative 4-8-93 (Register 93, No. 11).
  5. Redesignation of former subsection (p)(1) to new subsection (p)(1)(A), new subsections (p)(1)(B)-(p)(1)(C)3., and amendment of subsection (p)(2) filed 7-23-98; operative 8-22-98 (Register 98, No. 30).

 

3283.Anchors and Fittings – Title 8, Article 5.Window Cleaning

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(a) General Requirements.

(1) An installed anchor shall not be used for any purpose other than attachment of window cleaner’s belt terminals. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8503(a)1.)

(2) Anchors shall be installed on the inside of a window which is to be washed from the inside but presents a hazard of falling through to the outside, as defined in Section 3282(g)(2). (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8503(a)2.)

(3) A window to be cleaned from the sill shall be suited structurally to the installation of anchors and, when opened, shall not interfere with the attachment of window cleaner’s belt terminals to the anchors. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8503(a)3.)

(4) Vertically pivoted or hinged windows to be cleaned from the sill shall have an unobstructed passage to the exterior sill that is at least 16 inches wide by 40 inches high. Double-hung, single-hung or counterbalanced windows shall have a minimum passage 21 inches wide and 30 inches high from the sill. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8503(a)4.)

(5) The maximum width of a double-hung or single-hung window to be washed while standing on sill or ledge, supported by an anchor on either side of the window is 6 feet. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8503(a)5.)

(6) The width of a stationary panel to be washed from the inside from an adjacent open casement window shall not be more than 2 1/2 feet.

NOTE: Assuming that the window cleaner could work from the inside alternately from casement panels on each side of the stationary panel, this would mean that a 5 foot width of stationary panel would be the maximum width that could be handled in this manner without anchors. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8503(a)6.)

(7) Stationary panels up to 5 feet in width may be cleaned by standing on a sill or ledge (See Figure 1 for width and slope restrictions) while supported by anchors on each side of the panels if access is provided via an openable panel adjacent to the stationary panel. For stationary panels over 5 feet, but not exceeding 6 feet in width, the sill or ledge must be at least 10 inches wide with a slope not exceeding 5 degrees. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8503(a)7.)

(8) A series of stationary panels without openable panels between shall require traveling methods utilizing a method, such as double-headed anchors, overhead trolley system, or other equivalent means of providing a continuous means for window cleaners to tie off their safety belts. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8503(a)8.)

(9) Traveling on the outside of the building shall not be permitted where the sill or ledge is less than 6 feet wide unless it is possible to keep at least one window cleaner’s belt terminal attached at all times. The distance between anchors shall not exceed 4 feet horizontally unless the sill or ledge is at least 12 inches wide and the slope is less than 5 degrees in which case the distance between anchors may be as much as 6 feet. This method of traveling shall not be permitted, however, if the sill or ledge is not continuous with at least 6 inches in front of the mullions or if each window unit is not readily accessible.

(10) When the roof level or ledge is 8 feet or more in width, as measured from the face of the building to the danger point, no special protection, such as parapet, railing or window anchors, is required.

When the distance is from 6 feet to 8 feet wide, anchors are required unless there is a railing or parapet at least 2 feet high.

When the distance is less than 6 feet, anchors or equivalent protection as required by Section 3212 shall be required. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8503(a)9.)

(11) Traveling methods that comply with these regulations shall not be permitted on ledges or sills less than 6 feet in width unless double-headed anchors or 2 single-headed anchors with separate usable heads are provided on each side of all windows in the series, along with at least one openable panel to afford a safe, convenient means of access. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8503(a)10.)

(12) Where double-headed anchors are installed, they shall be placed so that there is enough free room for belts to be attached to both terminals at one anchor location along with the capability for either belt to be removed independently. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8503(a)11.)

(b) Anchor Design and Material Specifications.

(1) All window anchors and fittings shall comply with the applicable portions of Section 4.5 of ANSI/ASME A39.1-1991, Safety Requirements for Window Cleaning, which is herein incorporated by reference. Manufacturers of window anchors and fittings shall submit to the Division all pertinent test and other data called for by this Order. Only those anchors and fittings granted approval by the Division shall be used.

(2) The manufacturer or authorized representative, of any window unit intended for installation in new construction or remodeling shall submit evidence satisfactory to the Division that the complete installation with approved anchors has successfully withstood the drop test specified in paragraph 4.5.3(d)(2) of ANSI/ASME A39.1-1991, Safety Requirements for Window Cleaning, which is herein incorporated by reference, without failure of the frame at the point of attachment of the anchors and without detachment of the window unit from its attachments to the wall section. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8503(b).)

(c) Anchor Location.

(1) Anchor Side Clearance. The center line of the anchor head shall be at least one inch away from obstructions at either side that would interfere with engagement of belt terminals.

(2) Clearance Above and Below Anchors. Because many belt terminals slide onto the anchor from above and extend 4 or 5 inches below the anchor when attached, obstructions shall not be allowed within this distance above or below the anchor head.

(3) Minimum Bolt Edge Distance. The minimum distance from the face of the building for bolt installations when the bolt is placed in a reveal shall be as follows:

In Reinforced Concrete–2 1/2 inches if secured to reinforcing steel.

In Brick–At brick joint, not less than 8 inches from building face. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8503(c).)

(d) Anchor Installations.

(1) Locations. Anchors shall be attached to the side frames of the window or to the building at a point no less than 42 inches nor more than 51 inches above the window sill.

EXCEPTION: Where the windows are less than 48 inches in height and of such design that the window cleaner would normally work from the outside, anchors shall be located at a height above the sill that is approximately two-thirds the total height of the window.

(2) Wood. When the anchor and bolt are forged as one piece, such anchors may be used in single or double configurations when provided with a front collar to prohibit anchor rotation and a rear flat washer of at least twice the diameter of the bolt with a lock washer and nut. The bolts shall be a minimum of 3/8-inch in diameter and shall pass through a solid section of the window construction. The drilled hole shall be no more than 1/16-inch larger than the bolt, and any excess bolt thread shall be cut off and the thread peened over or upset to prohibit the nut from loosening or being removed.

When anchors are employed with separate bolt(s), the preceding conditions will apply, provided that either two machine or carriage bolts are employed, or certain special anchor types have one bolt with screws to prohibit anchor movement. All anchors and hardware shall be of Type 303, 304, or 316 stainless and shall meet or exceed the material requirements of these orders. Anchor nuts shall be tamper proof.

(3) Concrete. Anchors attached to concrete poured-in-place in buildings erected after October 3, 1955 shall be installed while the concrete is being placed. Such anchors shall extend not less than 5 inches into the concrete and shall have a cross-sectional area of not less than one-fourth of a square inch and shall be provided with a fluke at the end of the anchor not less than 1 inch in length.

(4) Masonry. Anchors attached to masonry, other than concrete poured-in-place, in buildings erected after October 3, 1955, shall be installed while the wall is under construction and shall be shaped to build into the joints between masonry units. Such anchors shall be not less than 8 1/2 inches long and shall have a cross-sectional area of not less than one-fourth of a square inch at all unexposed points and shall have a fluke

or flukes having holding surface of not less than 1 inch in length that shall be firmly imbedded in the masonry.

(5) Masonry and Concrete. Anchors installed on buildings of masonry and concrete construction erected before October 3, 1955 shall be attached to the window frame as required in these orders, or by other methods acceptable to the Division.

(6) Hollow Metal. Anchors attached to hollow metal construction shall be installed by one of the following methods:

(A) At least two machine screws or bolts of 3/8-inch diameter stainless steel or equivalent passing through the frame and a steel reinforcing plate 3/8-inch thick that extends not less than 5 inches above the top bolt hole, placed on the inside of the frame and secured by means of nuts and lock washers. In cases where it is impracticable to provide nuts and lock washers, the reinforcing plate may be tapped to receive 3/8-inch diameter bolts, and the bolts shall extend through the plate.

(B) Where the threaded bolt is an integral part of the anchor, it shall be at least 1/2-inch in diameter and shall be secured by means of a nut and lock washer, or any other method acceptable to the Division.

(C) Bolts used to attach anchor fastenings shall be secured by means of nuts tightened to the torque specified by the bolt manufacturer or other equivalent means.

(7) Solid Metal. Anchors attached to solid metal construction shall be installed by one of the following methods:

(A) At least two machine screws or bolts of 3/8-inch diameter stainless steel or equivalent passing through the frame and secured by means of nuts and lock washers. In cases where it is impracticable to provide nuts and lock washers, the metal frame shall be reinforced with a 3/8-inch thick plate, 6 inches long, tapped to receive both attaching bolts which shall extend through the reinforcing plate.

(B) Where the threaded bolt is an integral part of the anchor, it shall be at least 1/2-inch in diameter and shall be secured by means of a nut and lock washer, or any other method acceptable to the Division.

(C) Bolts used to attach anchor fastenings shall be secured by means of nuts tightened to the torque specified by the bolt manufacturer or other equivalent means.

(8) Aluminum.

(A) When anchors are attached to hollow or solid aluminum frames, the reinforcing plate shall be coated or protected so as to minimize electrolytic action between unlike metals.

(B) All anchors and anchor fastenings shall be provided with means to prevent them from turning, backing off or becoming loose.

(C) Bolts used to attach anchor fastenings shall be secured by means of nuts tightened to the torque specified by the bolt manufacturer or other equivalent means.

(9) The use of expansion shield anchors is prohibited. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8503(d).)

(e) Inspection of Anchors and Fittings. Inspection of window cleaning anchors and fittings on buildings shall be conducted at least every 12 months.

(f) Anchor Replacement. Anchors and fittings subject to impact loading or other possible structural damage shall be replaced. Replacement shall be as specified by the anchor manufacturer or other method acceptable to the Division.

NOTE: Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code; and Section 18943(c), Health and Safety Code.

HISTORY

  1. Amendment filed 7-16-76; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 76, No. 29).
  2. Editorial correction filed 10-7-83; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 83, No. 41).
  3. Amendment of subsections (a)(8), (b)(1) and (2), (d)(2) and (5) filed 9-12-85; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 85, No. 37).
  4. Amendment filed 3-9-93; operative 4-8-93 (Register 93, No. 11).

 

3284.Window Cleaner’s Belts, Safety Belts, Harnesses and Other Attachments – Title 8, Article 5.Window Cleaning

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(a) Window Cleaner’s Belts.

(1) General Requirements.

Window cleaner’s belts shall be approved and kept in good repair and visually inspected for defects prior to each use. They shall be inspected at least twice a year by the employer and all parts showing defects or excessive wear shall be promptly replaced. The use of natural fiber or canvas terminal straps (runners) is prohibited.

(A) Each belt shall be numbered or given an identifying mark, and a record kept showing date of purchase, dates when terminal rope straps were renewed, and dated when entire belt assembly was inspected.

(B) Window cleaners using a window cleaner’s belt shall attach one belt terminal to an anchor before stepping out onto the sill. During the operation of window cleaning, both belt terminals shall be attached to the anchors.

(C) The fittings on the waistband through which the terminal strap or rope passes, shall be so constructed that it will be impossible for the safety terminal to pass through them.

(D) Metal thimbles, or equivalent, shall be provided where ropes or straps are secured to eyes or rings.

(2) Belt Design.

(A) All window cleaner’s belts shall be designed, built and labeled to conform to ANSI/ASME A39.1-1995, Safety Requirements for Window Cleaning which is hereby incorporated by reference.

(B) In no case shall load carrying members be constructed of leather.

Note: It is not the intent of this regulation to prohibit the use of window cleaner’s belts that meet the requirements of ANSI A39.1-1969, 1987, or 1991 and are so labeled.

(b) Safety Belts and Harnesses.

(1) General Requirements. Lanyards shall be kept as short as reasonably practicable to minimize the possibility and length of a free fall. The length of the lanyard shall be as short as practicable. Care shall be used to see that the lanyard is attached to a verified anchorage in such a manner that will develop its full strength. Lanyards with knots, hitches, or bends shall not be used.

(A) Lanyards consisting of wire rope or rope covered wire shall not be used in window cleaning operations while standing on sills.

(B) Chest harnesses shall not be used in window cleaning operations.

(C) Body belts and their associated lanyards when subjected to a fall shall produce a stopping force of not more than 5 times gravity.

(D) Body harness and its associated lanyards when subjected to a fall shall produce a stopping force of not more than 8 times gravity.

(E) Belts and harnesses and their lanyards which have been subjected to impact loading shall be removed from service and destroyed.

(F) Belts and harnesses and their lanyard assemblies shall be visually inspected for defects prior to each use. They shall be inspected according to the manufacturer’s recommendations by the employer at least twice each year. The date of the most current semi-annual inspection shall be recorded on an inspection tag which shall be attached to the belt. In addition, records shall be kept and maintained showing date of purchase, dates when attachments were renewed, and dates when the entire belt assembly was inspected and by whom.

(G) The free ends of the lanyards of synthetic materials shall be lightly seared and, in the case of round rope, shall also be seized (whipped).

(H) Belts having single pass, fixed or sliding bar, friction buckles shall not be used for window cleaning operations.

(I) Safety lines shall be capable of supporting a dead weight of 5000 pounds.

(J) Double-acting Snap hooks shall be provided on all lanyards to minimize the possibility of accidental disengagement. The snap keeper shall be restrained by the snap nose to absorb side loads.

(K) Rope lanyards shall be spliced directly to the belt through an integral rope loop, spliced to a dee ring or spliced to a snap hook for attaching to the dee ring. Splices to hardware shall be over suitable thimbles.

(L) Web lanyards used on belts without dee rings shall terminate in a sewn eye of sufficient size to accommodate the width of the belt, but no larger. To the free end shall be sewn a snap hook in accordance with the standard, which shall result in a finished lanyard capable of meeting the qualification tests indicated in Appendix (C).

(M) Safety belts and harnesses ordered or purchased after July 1, 1993 shall have a durable label permanently affixed stating that the belt or harness meets the testing requirements of Article 6, Appendix C. The durable label shall contain at least the following information:

  1. Name or designation of manufacturer.
  2. Model designation.
  3. Date manufactured.
  4. Serial number.
  5. Test Specifications.

(c) All personal fall arrest systems, personal fall restraint systems and positioning devices used in window cleaning operations shall comply with Section 1670 of the Construction Safety Orders.

NOTE

Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code.

HISTORY
  1. Editorial correction filed 10-7-83; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 83, No. 41).
  2. Amendment of subsections (a)(1) and (b)(2)(C) filed 9-12-85; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 85, No. 37).
  3. Amendment of heading and section filed 3-9-93; operative 4-8-93 (Register 93, No. 11).
  4. Amendment of section heading and subsections (a)(1), (a)(2)(A) and (a)(2)(B), repealer of subsections (a)(2)(A)1.-5., and new subsection (c) filed 3-31-2000; operative 4-30-2000 (Register 2000, No. 13).

 

3285.Suspended Scaffolds – Title 8, Article 5.Window Cleaning

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Use and Application. Suspended transportable scaffolds shall comply with the applicable provisions of Article 23 of the Construction Safety Orders, and permanent scaffolds shall be installed as required by Article 6 of the General Industry Safety Orders.

(a) No manually operated suspended scaffold for which the rigging must be suspended by hand shall be extensible to more than 130 feet from the work platform to the upper anchorage.

(1) No power operated suspended scaffold for which the rigging must be suspended by hand shall be extensible to more than 130 feet from the work platform to the upper anchorage, unless the rigging and suspended safety lines are raised and lowered by mechanical means. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8504 (a).)

(b) When a suspended scaffold is suspended over an area traveled by workers, the public or vehicular traffic, the ground area directly under the work zone shall be effectively blocked by means of barricades, or an attendant shall be stationed so as to keep the area clear. Warning signs shall also be posted below.

(c) When on a working platform, each window cleaner shall be protected by a personal fall arrest system meeting the requirements of Article 6, Appendix C, Section I of the General Industry Safety Orders, and as otherwise provided by these orders.

(1) Dog lines shall not be used in lieu of an independent safety line on two-line suspended, transportable scaffolds having only one suspension line at each end of the scaffold.

(d) Permanent scaffolds shall be provided on all buildings exceeding 130 feet in height. All permanent scaffold installations installed after July 1, 1993, shall be installed and comply with the provisions of Article 6. All permanent scaffold installations installed prior to July 1, 1993, and after September 29, 1974 shall be installed and comply with all provisions of Article 6, Appendix D. Permanent scaffolds installed prior to September 29, 1974 shall be inspected, tested and maintained in accordance with the provisions of Article 6, Appendix D.

Note: For the purpose of this section, a permanent suspended scaffold and a permanent suspended work platform shall be considered to be the same. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8504 (b).)

NOTE

Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code.

HISTORY
  1. Amendment filed 7-16-76; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 76, No. 29).
  2. Amendment filed 10-29-80; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 80, No. 44).
  3. Editorial correction filed 10-7-83; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 83, No. 41).
  4. Amendment filed 9-12-85; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 85, No. 37).
  5. Amendment of first paragraph filed 5-1-90; operative 5-31-90 (Register 90, No. 23).
  6. Amendment of first paragraph and subsections (a)(1), (c) and (d) filed 3-9-93; operative 4-8-93 (Register 93, No. 11).
  7. Amendment of subsection (c) filed 3-31-2000; operative 4-30-2000 (Register 2000, No. 13).

 

3286.Manual Boatswain’s Chairs and Controlled Descent Apparatus (CDA) – Title 8, Article 5.Window Cleaning

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(a) Use and Application.

(1)(A) Boatswain’s chairs and CDAs shall be used for window cleaning operations only where the windows cannot be cleaned safely and practicably by other means.

(B) When boatswain’s chairs or CDAs are used for window cleaning operations, the following conditions shall be complied with:

  1. Manual boatswain’s chairs shall not be used where the height of suspension exceeds 75 feet or unless otherwise accepted by the Division where the heights exceed 75 feet.
  2. CDAs shall not be used where the height of suspension exceeds 130 feet or unless otherwise accepted by the Division in writing when the height exceeds 130 feet.
  3. Roof tie-backs or other approved independent anchorages shall be provided for each support line(s) and each safety line.
  4. Each support line(s) and each safety line shall be connected to approved independent anchorages.
  5. An Operating Procedures Outline Sheet (OPOS) shall be developed as required in Section 3282(p)(1)(C).

(2)(A) Employees shall be trained in the use of boatswain’s chairs and/or CDAs before they shall be permitted to use such equipment.

(B) Training shall include, but not be limited to, proper rigging of support lines, inspection of primary support line(s) and safety lines and anchorage, safe use of CDAs or boatswain’s chairs, fall arrest systems, and self rescue methods.

(3) When a boatswain’s chair or CDA is suspended over an area traversed by workers, pedestrians or vehicular traffic, the ground area below and within the window cleaner’s work zone shall be effectively blocked by barricades, or an attendant shall be stationed to keep the area clear. Warning signs shall also be posted below.

(4) Employees using boatswain’s chairs or CDAs shall be provided, and instructed in the use of, a personal fall arrest system meeting the requirements of Article 6, Appendix C, Section I of the General Industry Safety Orders, and as otherwise provided by these orders. Each employee’s fall arrest system shall be secured to an independent safety line attached to an approved anchorage.

(b) Rigging, Block and Tackle.

(1) Rope attachment to a block shall be by a thimble and splice.

(2) A safety hook or shackle shall be used on the upper block to prevent accidental disengagement.

(3) Each double block of luff (or watch) tackle shall be branded or otherwise clearly marked so as to indicate the fully extended length in feet from block to block.

(4) Where the chair connects to the block and tackle, a safety hook shall be used to prevent accidental rope disengagement.

(5) Tackle shall consist of rope equivalent in strength to 5,400 pounds. Blocks shall be compatible with the suspension rope diameter.

(6) Parapet or cornice hooks shall be provided with tie-back rings. Each parapet or cornice hook shall be tied back with wire rope to a roof tie-back or equivalent anchorage.

(c) Specifications.

(1)(A) Boatswain’s Chair. The chair shall be suspended from its four corners by means of rope slings. It shall have a seat not less than 24 inches long by 10 inches wide and, if of soft wood, 2 inches thick (1 1/8 inches if of oak or ash). It shall be reinforced across the full width by cleats securely fastened to each end. A rope or strap guard across the front and rear approximately 18 inches above the seat shall be provided. The seat may be constructed of material other than wood, provided the material is equivalent in strength to 2 inches of soft wood or 1 1/8 inches of oak or ash. If constructed of material of equivalent strength, cleats across the full width of the seat shall be provided unless structural analysis indicated they are not necessary. Other design and construction may be substituted if it can be shown to provide equal safety and strength.

(B) Boatswain’s chairs, their supports and all accessories shall be capable of supporting, without failure, 4 times the maximum load that may be placed thereon.

Note: See Section 3286(b)(1).

(C) Buckets used in boatswain’s chair work shall be attached in such a manner that the buckets will not fall.

(2) CDA Seatboards. (A) Seatboards shall be made of wood or other suitable materials, and may be reinforced. Seatboards shall be capable of supporting a live load of at least 250 pounds. All rope and webbing used in suspending the seatboard to a CDA shall be of synthetic fiber, preferably nylon or polyester, that has a rated minimum strength of 5000 pounds.

(B) Buckets used in seatboard work shall be attached in such a manner that they will not fall.

(d) Controlled Descent Apparatus (CDA)

(1)(A) CDA system shall include but not be limited to the following:

  1. Working line(s);
  2. Controlled descent device;
  3. Seatboard;
  4. Personal fall arrest system;
  5. Independent safety line (lifeline);
  6. Locking carbineer (D-ring).

Note: For the purpose of Section 3286 a full body harness is required as part of the personal fall arrest system.

(B) The controlled descent device and seatboard shall be permanently marked with:

  1. Manufacturer’s or Trade name, and
  2. Model number, and
  3. Identification (serial) number, and
  4. Date of manufacture.

(C) Working lines and safety lines shall be permanently marked or tagged with:

  1. Manufacturer’s name, and
  2. Length/size, and
  3. Date of manufacture, and
  4. Date placed in service.

(D) Personal fall arrest systems shall comply with the requirements in Article 6, Appendix C of the General Industry Safety Orders.

(2) The working line(s) shall be the proper size to pass over and/or around the fixed members of the controlled descent device body as recommended by the device manufacturer.

(3) Working lines, safety lines, and lanyards shall have spliced or swaged ends as per the rope manufacturer’s specifications.

(4) Lanyards shall not exceed 4 feet in length.

(5) Knots shall not be permitted at ends or anywhere along the length of lanyards, working lines or safety lines.

(6) Descent control devices shall be used in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Employees shall not be permitted to use descent control devices unless these devices are specifically designed for building maintenance or window cleaning operations.

(7) The entire CDA system shall be visually inspected before and during each use. If any part of the system shows excessive wear, damage or deformation, that part shall be removed from service and discarded.

(8)(A) Safety lines and lanyards shall be removed from service as recommended by the manufacturer or if one of the following conditions is evident or occurs:

  1. Braids or webbing are cut, or
  2. Excessive abrasion or worn fibers, or
  3. There is hardness or stiffness, or
  4. Dirt or grit has clogged fibers, or
  5. Rust, tar or grease is present, or
  6. Line size has been reduced, or
  7. Safety lines and lanyards are subjected to a shock load, or
  8. Safety lines and lanyards are exposed to chemicals that affect their strength, or
  9. Safety lines and lanyards are exposed to excessive ultra violet degradation.

(B) Working lines shall not be used longer than two (2) years from date first placed in service or three (3) years from date of manufacture.

(9) All descent control devices shall be 100% proof load tested at 3600 pounds without visual evidence of cracking, breaking or permanent deformation.

(10) Chemicals having adverse effects on the CDA system, as determined by the chemical or equipment manufacturer, shall not be used for window cleaning.

(11) Any working or safety line that passes over any edge of a building or structure or passes over any sharp object shall be protected from cutting and/or abrasion.

(12) Working lines that have been used to stop a CDA’s free fall of four feet or more in distance shall be removed from service.

(13) Working lines that have been subjected to a rapid descent by an employee using the CDA shall be removed from service.

(14) Prior to making a drop, the building exterior shall be visually inspected and, where necessary, appropriate measures taken to ensure that building features, such as sharp edges of parapets and window frames cannot impair the structural integrity of the CDA system or associated fall protection rigging.

(15) A safe means of access, which includes the use of a personal fall arrest system, shall be provided before employees gain access to and egress from CDA drop locations.

NOTE
Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code.
HISTORY
  1. Editorial correction filed 10-7-83; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 83, No. 41).
  2. Amendment of subsection (a)(4) and (b)(1) and (5) filed 9-12-85; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 85, No. 37).
  3. Amendment of subsections (a)(3), (a)(4) and (c)(1) filed 3-9-93; operative 4-8-93 (Register 93, No. 11).
  4. Amendment of section heading and section filed 7-23-98; operative 8-22-98 (Register 98, No. 30).
  5. Amendment of subsection (a)(4) filed 3-31-2000; operative 4-30-2000 (Register 2000, No. 13).

 

3287.Ladders – Title 8, Article 5.Window Cleaning

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(a) Use and Application.

(1) Ladders shall be used for window cleaning only where the windows cannot otherwise be cleaned safely and practicably by means of approved anchors and window cleaning belts, but this method shall not be used to clean a window that requires the use of a fully extended extension ladder in excess of 40 feet.

(2) At all times when a cleaner is working on a ladder over 18 feet working length, a person shall stand at the foot of it, face it, and hold it with both hands.

(3) All ladders shall be used at such a pitch that the horizontal distance from the top support to the foot of the ladder is one-quarter the assembled length of the ladder (i.e., the length along the ladder between the foot and the top support).

Note: Nonslip bases are not intended as a substitute for care in safely placing, lashing or holding a ladder that is being used on oily, metal, concrete or slippery surfaces.

(4) Pointed ladders may be used for window cleaning. Rollers shall not be used at the point.

(5) Portable metal ladders shall not be used in the vicinity of electrical circuits in places where they may come in contact with them. Portable metal ladders shall be legibly marked with signs reading “CAUTION – Do Not Use Around Electrical Equipment,” or equivalent wording.

(6) Each ladder shall be inspected daily and those which developed defects shall be withdrawn from service for repair or destruction and shall be tagged or marked “Danger, Do Not Use.” Improvised repairs shall not be made.

(7) Ladders shall be stored in such a manner as to provide ease of access or inspection, and to prevent danger of accident when withdrawing a ladder for use. Ladders, when not in use, shall be stored at a location where they will not be exposed to the elements, but where there is good ventilation. Wood ladders shall not be stored near radiators, stoves, steam pipes, or other places subjected to excessive heat or dampness. Rungs shall be kept free of grease and oil.

(8) Sectional ladders shall not be used by more than one man at a time, or with ladder jacks and scaffold planks.

(9) The top rest for the ladder shall be rigid and shall have ample strength to support the applied load. Ladders shall not be placed in front of doors unless the door is blocked open, locked or guarded. They shall not be placed on boxes, barrels or other unstable bases to obtain additional height.

(10) When ascending, working upon or descending the ladder, the user shall face the ladder.

(11) The use of ladders with hooks attached, to be hung on or over a parapet wall or other projection, shall not be permitted in window cleaning.

(12)(A) No employee shall be permitted to stand on or work from the top 3 rungs of a ladder unless there are structural members that provide a firm handhold or the employee is protected from falling by a personal fall protection system (e.g., positioning device or fall restraint system) in accordance with the requirements of Section 1670 of the Construction Safety Orders.

(B) Stepladders. Employees shall not sit, kneel, step or, stand on the pail shelf, topcap or the step below the topcap of a stepladder.

Exception: Employees may stand on the step below the topcap provided it is located 18 inches under the topcap.

Note: Tops of self supporting ladders shall not be considered as a rung.

(13) No ladder shall be used where the base of the ladder is above grade unless there is a safe means of access to the base and adequate fastenings to prevent the ladder from slipping or falling.

(14) Ladders shall not be used on scaffolds to gain additional height.

(b) Specifications.

(1) Portable ladders shall comply with Section 3276 of the General Industry Safety Orders.

Exception: Refer to Section 3287(a)(1) for maximum length.

(2) All ladders shall be equipped with nonslip bases suitable to the bearing surface. Middle and top sections shall not be used as bottom sections unless the user equips them with nonslip bases.

 

NOTE:

Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code.

 

HISTORY:
  1. Editorial correction filed 10-7-83; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 83, No. 41).
  2. Amendment of subsections (a)(5), (a)(11) and new subsection (a)(14) filed 9-12-85; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 85, No. 37).
  3. Amendment of subsections (b)(1) and (b)(2), renumbering of subsection (b)(3) to subsection (b)(4), and new subsection (b)(3) filed 3-9-93; operative 4-8-93 (Register 93, No. 11).
  4. Redesignation and amendment of former subsection (a)(12) to subsection (a)(12)(A) and new subsection (a)(12)(B) filed 3-31-2000; operative 4-30-2000 (Register 2000, No. 13).
  5. Amendment of subsection (b)(1), repealer of subsections (b)(2)-(3) and subsection renumbering filed 12-8-2010; operative 1-7-2011 (Register 2010, No. 50).
  6. Amendment of subsection (a)(12)(B) and new Exception filed 12-29-2011; operative 1-28-2012 (Register 2011, No. 52).

 

3288.Rolling Scaffolds – Title 8, Article 5.Window Cleaning

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Scaffolds used for window cleaning shall be of construction at least equivalent to that required by Article 22 of the Construction Safety Orders and shall be used in accordance with those orders.

NOTE: Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code.

HISTORY
  1. Editorial correction filed 10-7-83; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 83, No. 41).
  2. Amendment of heading and section filed 3-9-93; operative 4-8-93 (Register 93, No. 11).

 

3289.Tools – Title 8, Article 5.Window Cleaning

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Extension tools over 6 feet long shall not be used to clean windows from a position above grade. Extension devices so used shall be secure to prevent inadvertent detachment of the brush or squeegee.

NOTE: Operations in proximity to high-voltage lines are restricted by High-Voltage Electrical Safety Orders, Article 37.

NOTE: Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code.

HISTORY
  1. Editorial correction filed 10-7-83; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 83, No. 41).
  2. Amendment filed 9-12-85; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 85, No. 37).
  3. Change without regulatory effect filed 9-23-88 (Register 88, No. 41).
  4. Repealer of section 3289 and renumbering of section 3291 to section 3289 filed 3-9-93; operative 4-8-93 (Register 93, No. 11).

 

3290.Prohibited Equipment – Title 8, Article 5.Window Cleaning

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Window jacks or portable sills shall not be used in window cleaning.

NOTE: Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code.

HISTORY
  1. Editorial correction filed 10-7-83; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 83, No. 41).

 

3291.Special Design Considerations, Permanent Roof Top Installations – Title 8, Article 5.Window Cleaning

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(a) General. A Civil or Mechanical Engineer registered in the State of California shall prepare calculations and/or plans substantiating the structural integrity of all facets of the complete installation, including the eyebrow sleeves, roof davit systems, roof outrigger beams, and roof tie-backs. Such plans shall be available to the Division at the installation site.

(b) Projecting Ledges or “Eyebrows” at Roof Level.

(1) Those buildings so designed that projecting ledges or “eyebrows” at the roof or intervening levels prohibit the normal suspension of ropes supporting suspended scaffolds, shall be provided with sleeves that extend through the ledge or eyebrow. The minimum inside diameter of the sleeve shall be 6 inches to permit the passage of shackles, sockets, clamps and other rigging devices. The center-on-center spacing of sleeves shall be consistent with the length of the suspended scaffold to be utilized, but in no case shall this spacing exceed 24 feet for transportable scaffolds. Sleeves shall not be used as a rigging point unless securely anchored to the structure and be capable of supporting the rated load with a minimum safety factor of four.

NOTE: In lieu of the use of sleeves, other means of scaffold support, such as soffit monorail systems, etc., that offer equivalent safety and are acceptable to the Division, may be provided.

(2) Each sleeve assembly or each scaffold support system shall be provided with a securely affixed durable and readily visible metal plate bearing the rated load and installer’s name in letters at least 1/4-inch in height. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8505(b).)

(c) Roof Davit Systems.

Roof davit systems specifically shall comply with applicable provisions of Article 6 and the following:

(1) Each davit shall be provided with a securely affixed, durable and readily visible metal plate bearing the following information in letters at least 1/4-inch in height:

(A) The davit’s rated load, based upon a safety factor of 4.

(B) Manufacturer’s name.

(C) Precautionary warning message prohibiting use of the davit within 10 feet of high-voltage lines.

(2) Provisions shall be made to easily rotate davits while on the scaffold platform or boatswain’s chair unless the platform may be safely re-positioned inboard or outboard without the necessity for personnel to stand on unguarded roofs or ledges unless protected by a personal fall restraint system complying with the requirements of Section 1670 of the Construction Safety Orders.

(3) Portable davit systems shall comply with the applicable provisions of Article 6. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8505(c).)

(d) Outrigger Beams.

(1) Outrigger beams shall not be employed on buildings exceeding 130 feet in height unless acceptable to the Division. All outrigger beams shall be designed to support the rated load imparted by the suspended scaffold or boatswain’s chair with a safety factor of at least 4. Outrigger beams shall not extend more than 6 feet beyond the face of the building. Only steel or high strength alloy beams shall be used. The inboard end of outrigger beams, measured from the fulcrum point to the anchorage point, shall be not less than 1 1/2 times the outboard end in length. The fulcrum point of the beam shall rest on leg(s) or equivalent supports securely attached to the beam and so arranged as to prevent lateral overturning of the beam. Bearing pads shall be securely affixed to each support and shall be of sufficient area to safely distribute imposed loads to the roof structure. The inboard ends of outrigger beams shall be securely anchored by means of tension members (tie-down) affixed to the structural frame of the roof in such a manner that applied forces are resisted within allowable limits affording a safety factor of at least 4. All tie-down fittings at the inboard end of the beam shall be of a type that vibration effects shall not produce accidental disengagement. Safety hooks for beam tie-down purposes shall not be used. The use of counterweights at the inboard end of mobile and fixed outrigger beams are prohibited.

(2) The use of counterweights on the inboard end of portable or transportable outrigger beams shall be permitted only when the following conditions have been met:

(A) The building on which the counterweight beam is to be used, was constructed prior to July 23, 1990.

(B) The building was not designed for other suspension systems.

(C) An Operating Procedures Outline Sheet (OPOS) shall be developed in accordance with Section 3282(p) of these orders.

(D) The counterweights shall be secured to the inboard ends of beams and shall consist of non-flowable solid materials (e.g., concrete, steel, etc.).

(E) The outrigger shall be secured with a tie-back to a verified anchorage on the building during the entire time of use. The anchorage shall be designed to have a safety factor of not less than four based on the rated capacity of the outrigger.

(F) The counterweight shall provide a stability factor of at least 4 against overturning or upsetting of the outrigger.

(G) Each outrigger shall be designed by a registered engineer to support a load of 4 times the rated hoist capacity or the total load whichever is greater. Outrigger beams shall have a minimum rated capacity of 1000 pounds.

(H) The outrigger beam shall be secured against horizontal movement when in use.

(I) Portable outriggers weighing more than 80 pounds shall be provided with a stable means for its transport (wheels or cart).

(J) Each outrigger shall be so located that the suspension wire ropes, for two point suspended working platforms, are hung parallel.

(K) The parts of sectional outrigger beam(s) (i.e. an outrigger beam(s) consisting of more than one piece) shall be identified (e.g. numbered, color-coded). Parts shall not be interchanged or substituted except with the approval of the manufacturer.

(3) Each outrigger beam shall be provided with a securely affixed, durable and readily visible metal plate bearing the following information in letters at least 1/4-inch in height:

(A) The beam’s rated load.

(B) Manufacturer’s name.

(C) Precautionary warning message prohibiting use of the beam within 10 feet of high-voltage lines. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 3105A.4.2.)

(e) Portable Outrigger Beams. The use of portable outrigger beams shall comply with the applicable provisions of Article 6. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8505(d).)

(f) Roof Tie-Backs.

(1) Every building constructed 3 stories or 36 feet or more in height, shall have roof tie-backs or other permanent devices installed at the roof level for the purpose of securing or tying back suspended scaffold hooks or clamps and safety lines.

Exceptions:
  1. Roof tie-backs are not required on buildings employing other acceptable means of permanently installed roof top maintenance systems specified in this Article or Article 6.
  2. Roof tie-backs are not required on buildings constructed up to 4 stories or 48 feet in height when building maintenance can be accomplished using extension tools, ladders, approved ground equipment such as scaffolds, or aerial devices designed and used for positioning personnel.

(2) Such devices should be spaced at approximately 12-foot intervals; however, the spacing shall depend primarily on the availability of roof structural framing members of sufficient strength to safely carry applied loads. Tie-backs may be installed in structural parapets that are of adequate strength to sustain applied loads, but, placement shall be as close to the roof level as practicable. Design criteria for tie-backs shall be as follows:

(A) Roof tie-backs shall have at least a 2-inch inside diameter closed “eye.”

(B) Tie-back assembly shall be hot-dip galvanized or afforded equivalent corrosion resistance.

(C) Assembly and anchorage provisions adequate to sustain a 5000 pound load applied in any direction without permanent deformation.

(3) Suspended scaffolds shall not be permitted unless roof tie-backs or equivalent anchorages are provided.

(g) Parapets of Excessive Height. Where building parapet heights exceed 42 inches, special provisions shall be employed to provide a safe means of access to the top of the parapet for rigging purposes if such access is necessary to the safe performance of the work. If such support systems as davit/sockets, parapet hooks or clamps, etc., are utilized at the top of parapets, a catwalk platform meeting the applicable sections of these orders, or other equivalent means of affording access for the safe performance of the work shall be provided. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8505(f).)

Note: Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code.

HISTORY
  1. Amendment filed 7-16-76; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 76, No. 29).
  2. Amendment filed 7-26-78; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 78, No. 30).
  3. Editorial correction of subsection (c)(1) (Register 79, No. 17).
  4. Editorial correction filed 10-7-83; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 83, No. 41).
  5. Amendment filed 9-12-85; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 85, No. 37).
  6. Renumbering of section 3291 to section 3289 and renumbering and amendment of section 3292 to section 3291 filed 3-9-93; operative 4-8-93 (Register 93, No. 11).
  7. Amendment of subsection (f)(1) and Note filed 4-22-96; operative 5-22-96 (Register 96, No. 17).
  8. Change without regulatory effect redesignating former subsection (f)(3)(A) to new subsection (f)(4) filed 6-22-98 pursuant to section 100, title 1, California Code of Regulations (Register 98, No. 26).
  9. Amendment of subsections (d) and (d)(1), new subsections (d)(2)-(d)(2)(K), subsection renumbering and amendment of newly designated subsection (d)(3)(C) filed 7-23-98; operative 8-22-98 (Register 98, No. 30).
  10. Amendment of subsections (c)(1) and (c)(2) filed 3-31-2000; operative 4-30-2000 (Register 2000, No. 13).
  11. Amendment of subsections (a), (f)(1) and (f)(2)(A)-(C), repealer of subsection (f)(3), subsection renumbering, amendment of newly designated subsection (f)(3) and amendment of Note filed 3-27-2007; operative 4-26-2007 (Register 2007, No. 13).

Appendix A – Title 8, Article 5.Window Cleaning

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Appendix A. Operating Procedures Outline Sheet (OPOS).

An OPOS establishes safe window cleaning and exterior maintenance procedures for buildings and structures. An OPOS shall include all of the necessary elements in pictorial and written form, to instruct employees in the safe use of roof supported building maintenance equipment or window cleaning procedures not covered by these Orders. An OPOS shall contain at least the following elements:

  1. Isometric or plan view drawing (pictorial drawing) of the building’s roof, including the building’s name, address, and the date the OPOS was prepared; and
  2. The drawing shall be legible and kept with the building’s written assurance; and
  3. Identification of drop zones, recommended drop sequences, scaffold configurations, and specific building maintenance procedures including the equipment to be used, e.g. permanent roof rigging platform, ground rigged scaffolding, davits, outrigger beams, boatswain’s chair or seatboard, etc.; and
  4. Identification of all anchorage points for personal fall arrest systems and building maintenance equipment; and
  5. Identification of personal fall protection requirements and, if applicable, procedures for securing equipment; and
  6. If applicable, identification of all dangerous areas on the roof by highlighting all of the “Danger Zone(s)” on the pictorial drawing(s); and
  7. If applicable, description of the means and methods to be used to transfer equipment from drop location to drop location or between building levels; and
  8. Identification of equipment limitations, load ratings, and special use conditions; and
  9. Provisions for pre-operational, operation and maintenance inspections; and
  10. Identification of the access and egress to the work locations and the storage area(s) for the permanent or transportable building maintenance equipment; and
  11. If applicable, indication of the location and method of stabilization provided for the suspended equipment; and
  12. Emergency and rescue procedures, and means of communications to be used during such procedures; and
  13. Method(s) to be used to control employee exposure to falls while they are in the “Danger Zone.”

NOTE: Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code.

HISTORY
  1. Addition of Appendix A of Article 5 filed 7-23-98; effective 8-22-98 (Register 98, No. 9-Z).

Regulations governing powered platforms and equipment for building maintenance for buildings built after 1974 that are over 130 feet in height.

ARTICLE 6.POWERED PLATFORMS AND EQUIPMENT FOR BUILDING MAINTENANCE

3292.General – Title 8, Article 6.Powered Platforms and Equipment for Building Maintenance

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(a) Scope.

(1) This article covers powered platform installations permanently dedicated to interior or exterior building maintenance of a specific structure or group of structures. This article does not apply to suspended scaffolds used for construction work and covered under Article 23 of the Construction Safety Orders. Building maintenance includes, but is not limited to, such tasks as window cleaning, caulking, metal polishing and reglazing. Note: It is recognized because of special site conditions that certain provisions contained in Article 5 may be applicable and can be used in conjunction with equipment and/or practices in this article.

(2) Effective date. This article is effective July 1, 1993. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8520(a).)

(b) Application.

(1) New Installations. This article applies to all permanent installations completed after a July 1, 1993. Major modifications to existing installations completed after that date are also considered new installations under this article.

(2) Existing Installations.

(A) Permanent installations in existence and or completed before July 1, 1993 shall comply with Sections 3296 through 3299 and Appendix C of this article.

(B) In addition, permanent installations completed after September 29, 1974 and in existence and/or completed before July 1, 1993, shall comply with Appendix D of this Article. Note: For permanent installations completed before September 29, 1974, see Appendix D, subparagraph (b). (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2- 8520(b).)

(c) Assurance.

(1) Building owners of new installations shall inform the employer before each use in writing that the installation meets the requirements of Sections 3294 and 3295 relating to: required load sustaining capabilities of platforms, building components, hoisting and supporting equipment; stability factors for carriages, platforms and supporting equipment; maximum horizontal force for movement of carriages and davits; design of carriages, hoisting machines, wire rope and stabilization systems; and design criteria for electrical wiring and equipment.

(2) Building owners shall base the information required in subsection (c)(1) of this section on the results of a field test of the installation before it is placed into service and following any major alteration to an existing installation as required in Section 3296. The assurance shall also be based on all other relevant available information, including, but not limited to, test data, equipment specifications and verification by a professional engineer currently registered in the State of California.

(3) Building owners of all installations, new and existing, shall inform the employer in writing that the installation has been inspected, tested and maintained in compliance with the requirements of Sections 3296 and 3297 and that all protection anchorages meet the requirements of Section I paragraph (c)(10) in Appendix C of this article.

(4) Building owners shall make available to employers the manufacturer’s instruction manual and all other written documents necessary for the operation and maintenance of the building’s permanent powered platform installations.

(5) The employer shall not permit employees to use the installation prior to receiving written assurance from the building owner that the installation meets the requirements contained in subsections (c)(1), (c)(3) and (c)(4) of this section.

(d)(1) Owners of buildings or structures shall develop an emergency procedures plan to assure both safe access to and egress from suspended permanent or transportable exterior and/or interior equipment. Where an Operating Procedures Outline Sheet (OPOS) has been developed for the building or structure in accordance with Appendix A of Article 5, the emergency procedures plan shall be incorporated into the OPOS.

(A) The emergency procedures plan shall be developed on a contract plan sheet in written and/or pictorial form and be available for review at the site by affected employees.

(B) Necessary features such as safety belt anchorages and adequate safe walkways required during emergencies shall be incorporated into the structure itself and delineated on the emergency procedure plan.

Note: Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code.

HISTORY 1. Amendment of article heading and new section filed 3-9-93; operative 4-8-93 (Register 93, No. 11). For prior history, see Register 85, No. 37.

  1. Editorial correction of printing error in History 1. (Register 93, No. 28).
  2. Change without regulatory effect amending section heading and subsection (a) filed 7-6-93; operative 8-5-93 (Register 93, No. 28).
  3. Amendment of subsection (d)(1) and amendment of Note filed 4-27-2000; operative 5-27-2000 (Register 2000, No. 17).
  4. Amendment of subsection (c)(5) and amendment ofNote filed 3-27-2007; operative 4-26-2007 (Register 2007, No. 13).

 

3293.Definitions – Title 8, Article 6.Powered Platforms and Equipment for Building Maintenance

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Definitions for certain terms used in Article 6 and Appendixes A through C are located in Article 1, Section 3207 and Article 5, Section 3281. Definitions for the terms used in Appendix D are located in Appendix D and only apply to Appendix D. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8250(c).)

NOTE

Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code; and Section 18943(c), Health and Safety Code.

HISTORY
  1. Repealer and new section filed 3-9-93; operative 4-8-93 (Register 93, No. 11). For prior history, see Register 85, No. 37.
  2. Amendment filed 3-31-2000; operative 4-30-2000 (Register 2000, No. 13).

 

3294.Powered Platform Installations – Affected Parts of Buildings – Title 8, Article 6.Powered Platforms and Equipment for Building Maintenance

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(a) General Requirements.

The following requirements apply to affected parts of buildings which utilize working platforms for building maintenance:

(1) Structural supports, tie-downs, tie-in guides, anchoring devices and any affected parts of the building included in the installation shall be designed by or under the direction of a professional engineer currently registered in State of California and experienced in such design;

(2) Exterior installations shall be capable of withstanding prevailing climatic conditions;

(3) The building installation shall provide safe access to, and egress from, the equipment and sufficient space to conduct necessary maintenance of the equipment;

(4) The affected parts of the buildings shall have the capability of sustaining all the loads imposed by the equipment; and,

(5) The affected parts of the buildings shall be designed so as to allow the equipment to be used without exposing employees to a hazardous condition.

(b) Tie-in Guides.

(1) The exterior of each building shall be provided with tie-in guides unless the conditions in subsection (b)(2) or (b)(3) of this section are met.

Note: See Figure 1 in Appendix B of this Article for a description of a typical continuous stabilization system utilizing tie-in guides.

(2) If angulated roping is employed, tie-in guides required in subsection (b)(1) of this section may be eliminated for not more than 75 feet of the uppermost elevation of the building, if infeasible due to exterior building design, provided an angulation force of at least 10 pounds is maintained under all conditions of loading.

(3) Tie-in guides required in subsection(b)(1) of this section may be eliminated if one of the guide systems in subsection (b)(3)(A), (b)(3)(B) or (b)(3)(C) of this section is provided, or an equivalent.

(A) Intermittent Stabilization System. The system shall keep the equipment in continuous contact with the building facade, and shall prevent sudden horizontal movement of the platform. The system may be used together with continuous positive building guide systems using tie-in guides on the same building, provided the requirements for each system are met.

  1. The maximum vertical interval between building anchors shall be three floors or 50 feet, whichever is less.
  2. Building anchors shall be located vertically so that attachment of the stabilizer ties will not cause the platform suspension ropes to angulate the platform horizontally across the face of the building. The anchors shall be positioned horizontally on the building face so as to be symmetrical about the platform suspension ropes.
  3. Building anchors shall be easily visible to employees and shall allow a stabilizer tie attachment for each of the platform suspension ropes at each vertical interval. If more than two suspension ropes are used on a platform, only the two building-side suspension ropes at the platform ends shall require a stabilizer attachment.
  4. Building anchors which extend beyond the face of the building shall be free of sharp edges or points. Where cables, suspension wire ropes and safety lines may be in contact with the building face, external building anchors shall not interfere with their handling or operation.
  5. The intermittent stabilization system building anchors and components shall be capable of sustaining without failure at least four times the maximum anticipated load applied or transmitted to the components and anchors. The design wind load for each anchor shall be 600 pounds.
  6. The building anchors and stabilizer ties shall be capable of sustaining anticipated horizontal and vertical loads from winds specified for roof storage design which may act on the platform and wire ropes if the platform is stranded on a building face. If the building anchors have different spacing than the suspension wire ropes or if the building requires different suspension spacings on one platform, each building anchor and stabilizer tie shall be capable of sustaining the wind loads.

Note: See Figure 2 in Appendix B of this article for a description of a typical intermittent stabilization system.

(B) Button Guide Stabilization System.

  1. Guide buttons shall be coordinated with platform mounted equipment as specified in Section 3295(e)(6).
  2. Guide buttons shall be located horizontally on the building face so as to allow engagement of each of the guide tracks mounted on the platform.
  3. Guide buttons shall be located in vertical rows on the building face for proper engagement of the guide tracks mounted on the platform.
  4. Two guide buttons shall engage each guide track at all times except for the initial engagement.
  5. Guide buttons which extend beyond the face of the building shall be free of sharp edges or points. Where cables, ropes and safety lines may be in contact with the building face, guide buttons shall not interfere with their handling or operation.
  6. Guide buttons, connections and seals shall be capable of sustaining without damage at least the weight of the platform, or provision shall be made in the guide tracks or guide track connectors to prevent the platform and its attachments from transmitting the weight of the platform to the guide buttons, connections and seals. In either case, the design load shall be 600 pounds per building anchor.

Note: 1. See Section 3295(e)(6) for relevant equipment provisions.

  1. See Figure 3 in Appendix B of this article for a description of a typical button guide stabilization system.

(C) System utilizing angulated roping and building face rollers. The system shall keep the equipment in continuous contact with the building facade, and shall prevent sudden horizontal movement of the platform. This system is acceptable only where the suspended portion of the equipment in use does not exceed 130 feet above a safe surface or ground level, and where the platform maintains no less than 10 pounds angulation force on the building facade.

(4) Tie-in guides for building interiors (atriums) may be eliminated when a professional engineer currently registered in the State of California determines that an alternative stabilization system, including systems in Section 3294(b)(3)(A), (B) and (C) or a platform tie-off at each work station will provide equivalent safety.

(c) Roof Guarding.

(1) Buildings or structures shall be provided with a perimeter guard consisting of a parapet or guardrail system meeting the requirements of Section 3209 located above the adjacent horizontal surface on which portable equipment such as davits and outriggers beams are used to support suspended equipment or which provides access to or from such equipment.

(2) All parapet and guardrail systems installed on structures serviced by equipment meeting Article 6 requirements that is transported on a trackless-type roof car shall be designed and installed to withstand a minimum lateral force of 200 pounds per linear foot applied at 21 inches above the surface supporting the roof car. All other installations shall be designed and installed to withstand a minimum lateral force of 50 pounds per linear foot applied at the top of the standard height guardrail or parapet.

(3) The perimeter guard shall not be more than 6 inches inboard of the inside face of a barrier, i.e., the parapet wall or roof edge curb of the building being serviced; however, the perimeter guard location shall not exceed an 18-inch set-back from the building face.

(4) Where building features such as parapets or guardrails are required to support workers’ safety lines, they shall be designed to withstand the combined vector component loads imposed without causing damage to such building features.

(5) Parapets exceeding 6 feet in height above the building area roof surface requiring roof-rigged transportable suspended scaffold or similar equipment shall have a suitable peripheral walkway located 42 inches below the parapet on all areas using the exterior maintenance system. Rolling scaffolds or ladders shall not be used unless they, the roof and exterior maintenance systems are designed to be compatible with their use.

(6) A specifically designed fall protection system shall be provided and used on surfaces such as sloping roof areas where workers’ duties require that they gain access to or work from such areas.

(A) The fall protection system shall support a 5,000 pound safety line loading and enable the worker to ascend and descend the sloping surface in a controlled manner using a primary and secondary support line secured to a fall protection system at the upper end and to the safety line at the lower end.

(B) Access shall not be permitted on surfaces such as glazed roofs, vaults, or skylights unless an engineer currently registered in the State of California has certified that the surface will support all anticipated loads.

(d) Equipment Stops. Operational areas for trackless type equipment shall be provided with structural stops, such as curbs, to prevent equipment from traveling outside its intended travel areas and to prevent a crushing or shearing hazard.

(e) Maintenance Access. Means shall be provided to traverse all carriages and their suspended equipment to a safe area for maintenance and storage.

(f) Elevated Track.

(1) An elevated track system which is located four feet or more above a safe surface, and traversed by carriage supported equipment, shall be provided with a walkway and guardrail system; or

(2) The working platform shall be capable of being lowered, as part of its normal operation, to the lower safe surface for access and egress of the personnel and shall be provided with a safe means of access and egress to the lower safe surface.

(g) Tie-down Anchors. Imbedded tie-down anchors, fasteners, and affected structures shall be corrosion resistant.

(h) Cable Stabilization.

(1) Hanging safety lines and all cables not in tension shall be stabilized at each 200 foot interval of vertical travel of the working platform beyond an initial 200 foot distance.

(2) Hanging cables, other than suspended wire ropes, which are in constant tension shall be stabilized when the vertical travel exceeds an initial 600 foot distance, and at further intervals of 600 feet or less.

(i) Emergency Planning. A written emergency action plan shall be developed and implemented for each kind of working platform operation in conjunction with the emergency procedures plan required of the building owner by Section 3292(d)(1). This plan shall explain the emergency procedures which are to be followed in the event of a power failure, equipment failure or other emergencies which may be encountered. The plan shall also explain that employees inform themselves about the building emergency escape routes, procedures and alarm systems before operating a platform. Upon initial assignment and whenever the plan is changed, the employer shall review with each employee those parts of the plan which the employee must know to protect himself or herself in the event of an emergency.

(j) Building Maintenance. Repairs or major maintenance of those building portions that provide primary support for the suspended equipment shall not affect the capability of the building to meet the requirements of this standard.

(k) Electrical Requirements. The following electrical requirements apply to buildings which utilize working platforms for building maintenance:

(1) General building electrical installations shall comply with the Electrical Safety Orders, unless otherwise specified in this article;

(2) Building electrical wiring shall be of such capacity that when full load is applied to the equipment power circuit, not more than a five percent drop from building service-vault voltage shall occur at any power circuit outlet used by equipment regulated by this article;

(3) The equipment power circuit shall be an independent electrical circuit that shall remain separate from all other equipment within or on the building, other than power circuits used for hand tools that will be used in conjunction with the equipment. If the building is provided with an emergency power system, the equipment power circuit may also be connected to this system;

(4) The power circuit shall be provided with a disconnect switch that can be locked in the “OFF” and “ON” positions. The switch shall be conveniently located with respect to the primary operating area of the equipment to allow the operators of the equipment access to the switch;

(5) The disconnect switch for the power circuit shall be locked in the “ON” position when the equipment is in use; and

(6) An effective two-way voice communication system shall be provided between the equipment operators and persons stationed within the building being serviced. The communications facility shall be operable and shall be manned at all times by persons stationed within the building whenever the platform is being used. (Title 24, Part 2, 2-8521)

NOTE

Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code; and Section 18943(b), Health and Safety Code

HISTORY
  1. Repealer and new section filed 3-9-93; operative 4-8-93 (Register 93, No. 11). For prior history, see Register 85, No. 40.
  2. Editorial correction of subsection (c)(6)(B) (Register 95, No. 24).
  3. Amendment of subsection (i) and amendment of Note filed 4-27-2000; operative 5-27-2000 (Register 2000, No. 17).

3295.Powered Platform Installations – Equipment – Title 8, Article 6.Powered Platforms and Equipment for Building Maintenance

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(a) General Requirements. The following requirements apply to equipment which are part of a powered platform installation, such as platforms, stabilizing components, carriages, outriggers, davits, hoisting machines, wire ropes and electrical components:

(1) Equipment installations shall be designed by or under the direction of a professional engineer currently registered in the State of California and experienced in such design;

(2) The design shall provide for a minimum live load of 250 pounds for each occupant of a suspended or supported platform;

(3) Equipment that is exposed to wind when not in service shall be designed to withstand forces generated by winds of at least 100 miles per hour at 30 feet above grade;

(4) Equipment that is exposed to wind when in service shall be designed to withstand forces generated by winds of at least 50 miles per hour for all elevations; and

(5) Equipment shall not be cascaded between structure levels using craning methods unless the procedures and equipment utilized have been previously approved by the Division.

(b) Construction Requirements. Bolted connections shall be self-locking or shall otherwise be secured to prevent loss of the connections by vibration.

(c) Suspension Methods. Elevated building maintenance equipment shall be suspended by a carriage, outriggers, davits or an equivalent method.

(1) Carriages. Carriages used for suspension of elevated building maintenance equipment shall comply with the following:

(A) The horizontal movement of a carriage shall be controlled so as to ensure its safe movement and allow accurate positioning of the platform for vertical travel or storage;

(B) Powered carriages shall not exceed a traversing speed of 50 feet per minute;

(C) The initiation of a traversing movement for a manually propelled carriage on a smooth level surface shall not require a person to exert a horizontal force greater than 40 pounds;

(D) Structural stops and/or curbs shall be provided to prevent the traversing of the carriage beyond its designed limits of travel;

(E) Traversing controls for a powered carriage shall be of continuous pressure weatherproof type. Multiple controls when provided shall be arranged to permit operation from only one control station at a time. An emergency stop device shall be provided on each end of a powered carriage for interrupting power to the carriage drive motors;

(F) The operating control(s) shall be so connected that in the case of suspended equipment, traversing of a carriage is not possible until the suspended portion of the equipment is located at its uppermost designed position for traversing; and is free of contact with the face of the building or building guides. In addition, all protective devices and interlocks are to be in the proper position to allow traversing of the carriage;

(G) Stability for underfoot supported carriages shall be obtained by gravity, by an attachment to a structural support, or by a combination of gravity and a structural support. The use of flowing counterweights, such as water or sand, to achieve stability is prohibited.

  1. The stability factor against overturning shall not be less than two for horizontal traversing of the carriage, including the effects of impact and wind.
  2. The carriages and their anchorages shall be capable of resisting accidental over-tensioning of the wire ropes suspending the working platform, and this calculated value shall include the effect of one and one-half times the stall capacity of the hoist motor. All parts of the installation shall be capable of withstanding without damage to any part of the installation the forces resulting from the stall load of the hoist and one half the wind load.
  3. Roof carriages which rely on having tie-down devices secured to the building to develop the required stability against overturning shall be provided with an interlock which will prevent vertical platform movement unless the tie-down is engaged.

(H) An automatically applied braking or locking system, or equivalent, shall be provided that will prevent unintentional traversing of power traversed or power assisted carriages;

(I) A manual or automatic braking or locking system or equivalent, shall be provided that will prevent unintentional traversing of manually propelled carriages;

(J) A means to lock out the power supply for the carriage shall be provided;

(K) Safe access to and egress from the carriage shall be provided from a safe surface. If the carriage traverses an elevated area, any operating area on the carriage shall be protected by a guardrail system in compliance with the provisions of subsection (e)(1)(G) of this section. Any access gate shall be self-closing and self-latching, or provided with an interlock;

(L) Each carriage work station position shall be identified by location markings and/or position indicators; and

(M) The motors shall stall if the load on the hoist motors is at any time in excess of three times that necessary for lifting the working platform with its rated load.

(2) Portable Outriggers.

(A) Portable outriggers may be used as a method of suspension for ground rigged working platforms where the point of suspension does not exceed 130 feet above a safe surface unless acceptable to the Division.

(B) Platform stabilization system(s) shall be provided which meet the requirements of Section 3294(b).

(C) Portable outriggers shall be used only with self-powered, ground rigged working platforms.

(D) Each portable outrigger shall be secured with a tie-down to a verified anchorage on the building during the entire period of its use. The anchorage shall be designed to have a stability factor of not less than four against overturning or upsetting of the outrigger.

(E) Access to and egress from the working platform shall be from and to a safe surface below the point of suspension.

(F) The working platform shall be provided with wheels, casters or a carriage for traversing horizontally.

(G) Each portable outrigger shall be designed for lateral stability to prevent rollover in the event an accidental lateral load is applied to the outrigger. The accidental lateral load to be considered in this design shall be not less than 70 percent of the rated load of the hoist.

(H) Each portable outrigger shall be designed to support an ultimate load of not less than four times the rated load of the hoist.

(I) Each portable outrigger shall be so located that the suspension wire ropes for two point suspended working platforms are hung parallel.

(J) A portable outrigger shall be tied-down to a verified anchorage on the building with a rope equivalent in strength to the suspension rope.

(K) The tie-back rope shall be installed parallel to the centerline of the outrigger.

(L) Where applicable, the forces or weights referenced in Section 3295(c)(3)(D), (E) and (F) shall apply to outriggers.

(3) Davits.

(A) Every davit installation, fixed or portable, rotatable or non-rotatable shall be designed and installed to ensure that it has a stability factor against failure or overturning of not less than four.

(B) The following requirements apply to roof rigged davit systems:

  1. Access to and egress from the working platform shall be from a safe surface. Access or egress shall not require persons to climb over a building’s parapet or guard railing; and
  2. The working platform shall be provided with wheels, casters or a carriage for traversing horizontally.

(C) The following requirements apply to ground rigged davit systems:

  1. The point of suspension shall not exceed 130 feet above a safe surface unless acceptable to the Division;
  2. Platform stabilization system(s) shall be provided which meet the requirements of Section 3294(b); and
  3. Access and egress to and from the working platform shall only be from a safe surface below the point of suspension.

(D) A rotating davit shall not require a horizontal force in excess of 40 pounds per person to initiate a rotating movement.

(E) A davit or part of a davit weighing more than 80 pounds shall be provided with a means for its transport, which shall keep the center of gravity of the davit at or below 36 inches above the safe surface during transport.

(F) Davits or davit components which weigh more than 140 pounds shall be provided with a mechanical means for hoisting them into position.

(G) Portable davits shall have a maximum reach of 8 feet, 6 inches (2600 mm) and a maximum fully assembled weight of 300 pounds (135 kg).

(H) Roof-rigged davits shall be provided with pivoting sockets or with bases that will allow the insertion or removal of a davit at a position of not more than 35 degrees above the horizontal, with the complete davit inboard of the building face being serviced.

(I) A means shall be provided to lock the davit to its socket or base before it is used to suspend the platform.

(J) Portable davit sockets, if used, shall be fitted with wheels to allow ready movement from pedestal to pedestal, shall not require lifting to mate with the pedestal and shall have a pedestal pin attachment connection or positive locking pin connection to the pedestal. Socket/pedestal connections requiring bolts or other threaded fasteners shall not be used.

(d) Hoisting Machines.

(1) Raising and lowering of suspended or supported equipment shall be performed only by a hoisting machine.

(2) Each hoisting machine shall be capable of arresting any overspeed descent of the load.

(3) Each hosting machine shall be powered only by air, electric or hydraulic sources.

(4) Flammable liquids shall not be carried on the working platform.

(5) Each hoisting machine shall be capable of raising or lowering 125 percent of the rated load of the hoist.

(6) Moving parts of a hoisting machine shall be enclosed or guarded in compliance with Section 4002 of the General Industry Safety Orders.

(7) Winding drums, traction drums, sheaves and directional sheaves used in conjunction with hoisting machines shall be compatible with, and sized for, the wire rope used.

(8) Each winding drum shall be provided with a positive means of attaching the wire rope to the drum. The attachment shall be capable of developing at least four times the rated load of the hoist.

(9) Each hoisting machine shall be provided with a primary brake and at least one independent secondary brake, each capable of stopping and holding not less than 125 percent of the lifting capacity of the hoist.

(A) The primary brake shall be directly connected to the drive train of the hoisting machine, and shall not be connected through belts, chains, clutches, or set screw type devices. The brake shall automatically set when power to the prime mover is interrupted.

(B) 1. The secondary brake shall be an automatic emergency type of brake that, if actuated during each stopping cycle, shall not engage before the hoist is stopped by the primary brake.

  1. When a secondary brake is actuated, it shall stop and hold the platform within a vertical distance of 24 inches.

(10) Any component of a hoisting machine which requires lubrication for its protection and proper functioning shall be provided with a means for that lubrication to be applied.

(e) Suspended Equipment.

(1) General Requirements.

(A) Each suspended unit component, except suspension ropes and guardrail systems, shall be capable of supporting, without failure, at least four times the maximum intended live load applied or transmitted to that component.

(B) Each suspended unit component shall be constructed of materials that will withstand anticipated weather conditions.

(C) Each suspended unit shall be provided with a load rating plate, conspicuously located, stating the unit weight and rated load of the suspended unit.

(D) When the suspension points on a suspended unit are not at the unit ends, the unit shall be capable of remaining continuously stable under all conditions of use and position of the live load, and shall maintain at least a 1.5 to 1 stability factor against unit upset.

(E) Guide rollers, guide shoes or building face rollers shall be provided, and shall compensate for variations in building dimensions and for minor horizontal out-of-level variations of each suspended unit.

(F) Each working platform of a suspended unit shall be secured to the building facade by one or more of the following methods, or by an equivalent method:

  1. Continuous engagement to building anchors as provided in Section 3294(b)(1);
  2. Intermittent engagement to building anchors as provided in Section 3294(b)(3)(A);
  3. Button guide engagement as provided in Section 3294(b)(3)(B) ; or
  4. Angulated roping and building face rollers as provided in Section 3294(b)(3)(C).

(G) Each working platform of a suspended unit shall be provided with a guardrail system on all sides which shall meet the following requirements:

  1. The system shall consist of a top guardrail, midrail, and a toeboard;
  2. The system shall consist of a 42 inch high enclosure on the ends and outboard side. The inboard side shall be not less than 36 inches high;
  3. The top guardrail and midrail shall be able to withstand at least a 100 pound force applied in any direction;
  4. The areas between the guardrail and toeboard on the ends and outboard side, and the area between the midrail and toeboard on the inboard side, shall be closed with a material that is capable of withstanding a load of 100 pounds applied horizontally over any area of one square foot. The material shall have all openings small enough to reject passage of a one inch steel ball and potential falling objects which may be hazardous to persons below;
  5. Toeboards shall be capable of withstanding, without failure, a force of at least 50 pounds applied in any downward or horizontal direction at any point along the toeboard;
  6. Toeboards shall be three and one-half inches minimum in height from their top edge to the level of the platform floor;
  7. Toeboards shall be securely fastened in place at the outermost edge of the platform and have no more than one-half inch clearance above the platform floor; and
  8. Toeboards shall be solid or with an opening not over one inch in the greatest dimension.

(2) Two and Four-Point Suspended Working Platforms.

(A) The working platform shall be not less than 24 inches wide and shall be provided with a minimum of a 12 inch wide passage at or past any obstruction on the platform.

(B) The flooring shall be of slip-resistant type and shall contain no opening that would allow the passage of safety lines, cables and other potential falling objects. If a larger opening is provided, it shall be protected by placing a material under the opening which shall prevent the passage of a one inch steel ball and potential falling objects.

(C) The working platform shall be provided with a means of suspension that will restrict the platform’s inboard to outboard roll about its longitudinal axis to a maximum of 15 degrees from a horizontal plane when moving the live load from the inboard to the outboard side of the platform.

(D) Any cable suspended from above the platform shall be provided with a means for storage to prevent accumulation of the cable on the floor of the platform.

(E) All operating controls for the vertical travel of the platform shall be of the continuous-pressure type, and shall be located on the platform.

(F) Each operating station of every working platform shall be provided with a means of interrupting the power supply to all hoist motors to stop any further powered ascent or descent of the platform.

(G) The maximum rated speed of the platform shall not exceed 50 feet per minute with single speed hoists, nor 75 feet per minute with multi-speed hoists.

(H) Provisions shall be made for securing all tools, water tanks, and other accessories to prevent their movement or accumulation on the floor of the platform.

(I) Portable fire extinguishers conforming to the provisions of Section 6151 shall be provided and securely attached on all working platforms.

(J) Access to and egress from a working platform, except for those that land directly on a safe surface, shall be provided by stairs, ladders, platforms and runways conforming to the provisions of Article 4 of the General Industry Safety Orders. Access gates shall be self-closing and self-latching.

(K) Means of access to or egress from a working platform which is 48 inches or more above a safe surface shall be provided with a guardrail system or ladder handrails that conform to the provisions of Article 2 of the General Industry Safety Orders.

(L) The platform shall be provided with a secondary wire rope suspension system if the platform contains overhead structures which restrict the emergency egress of employees. A horizontal safety line or a direct connection anchorage shall be provided, as part of a fall arrest system which meets the requirements of Appendix C, for each employee on such a platform.

(M) A vertical safety line shall be provided as part of a fall arrest system which meets the requirements of Appendix C, for each employee on a working platform suspended by two or more wire ropes, if the failure of one wire rope or suspension attachment will cause the platform to upset. If a secondary wire rope suspension is used, vertical safety lines are not required for the fall arrest system, provided that each employee is attached to a horizontal safety line anchored to the platform.

(N) An emergency electric operating device shall be provided on roof powered platforms near the hoisting machine for use in the event of failure of the normal operating device located on the working platform, or failure of the cable connected to the platform. The emergency electric operating device shall be mounted in a secured compartment, and the compartment shall be labeled with instructions for use. A means for opening the compartment shall be mounted in a break-glass receptacle located near the emergency electric operating device or in an equivalent secure and accessible location.

(3) Single Point Suspended Working Platforms.

(A) The requirements of Section 3295(e)(2)(A) through (K) shall also apply to a single point working platform.

(B) Each single point suspended working platform shall be provided with a secondary wire rope suspension system, which will prevent the working platform from falling should there be a failure of the primary means of support, or if the platform contains overhead structures which restrict the egress of the employee. A horizontal safety line or a direct connection anchorage shall be provided, as part of a fall arrest system which meets the requirements of Appendix C.

(4) Ground-Rigged Working Platforms.

(A) Ground-rigged working platforms shall comply with all the requirements of Section 3295(e)(2)(A) through (M).

(B) After each day’s use, the power supply within the building shall be disconnected from a ground-rigged working platform, and the platform shall be either disengaged from its suspension points or secured and stored at grade.

(5) Intermittently Stabilized Platforms.

(A) The platform shall comply with Section 3295(e)(2)(A) through (M).

(B) Each stabilizer tie shall be equipped with a “quick connect-quick disconnect” device which cannot be accidentally disengaged, for attachment to the building anchor, and shall be resistant to adverse environmental conditions.

(C) The platform shall be provided with a stopping device that will interrupt the hoist power supply in the event the platform contacts a stabilizer tie during its ascent.

(D) Building face rollers shall not be placed at the anchor setting if exterior anchors are used on the building face.

(E) Stabilizer ties used on intermittently stabilized platforms shall allow for the specific attachment length needed to effect the predetermined angulation of the suspended wire rope. The specific attachment length shall be maintained at all building anchor locations.

(F) The platform shall be in continuous contact with the face of the building during ascent and descent.

(G) This attachment and removal of stabilizer ties shall not require the horizontal movement of the platform.

(H) The platform-mounted equipment and its suspension wire ropes shall not be physically damaged by the loads from the stabilizer tie or its building anchor. The platform, platform mounted equipment and wire ropes shall be able to withstand a load that is at least twice the ultimate strength of the stabilizer tie.

See Figure 2 in Appendix B of this article for a description of a typical intermittent stabilization system.

(6) Button-Guide Stabilized Platforms.

(A) The platform shall comply with Section 3295(e)(2)(A) through (M).

(B) Two guide tracks shall be mounted on the platform and shall provide continuous contact with the building face.

(C) Each guide track on the platform shall engage a minimum of two guide buttons during any vertical travel of the platform following the initial button engagement.

(D) Each guide track on a platform that is part of a roof rigged system shall be provided with a storage position on the platform.

(E) Each guide track on the platform shall be sufficiently maneuverable by platform occupants to permit easy engagement of the guide buttons, and easy movement into and out of its storage position on the platform.

(F) The load carrying components of the button guide stabilization system which transmit the load into the platform shall be capable of supporting the weight of the platform, or provision shall be made in the guide track connectors or platform attachments to prevent the weight of the platform from being transmitted to the platform attachments.

Note: See Figure 3 in Appendix B of this article for a description of a typical button guide stabilization system.

(f) Supported Equipment.

(1) Supported equipment shall maintain a vertical position in respect to the face of the building by means other than friction.

(2) Cog wheels or equivalent means shall be incorporated to provide climbing traction between the supported equipment and the building guides. Additional guide wheels or shoes shall be incorporated as may be necessary to ensure that the drive wheels are continuously held in positive engagement with the building guides.

(3) Launch guide mullions indexed to the building guides and retained in alignment with the building guides shall be used to align drive wheels entering the building guides.

(4) Occupied platforms used on supported equipment shall comply with the requirements of Section 3295(e)(2)(A), (e)(2)(B), and (e)(2)(D) through (K) covering suspended equipment.

(g) Suspension Wire Ropes and Rope Connections.

(1) Each specific installation shall use suspension wire ropes or combination cable and connections meeting the specification recommended by the manufacturer of the hoisting machine used. Connections shall be capable of developing at least 80 percent of the rated breaking strength of the wire rope.

(2) Each suspension rope shall have a “Design Factor” of at least 10. The “Design Factor” is the ratio of the rated strength of the suspension wire rope to the rated working load, and shall be calculated using the following formula:

Supported Equipment design factor equation

Where:

F=Design factor

S=Manufacturer’s rated strength of one suspension rope

N=Number of suspension ropes under load

W=Rated working load on all ropes at any point of travel

(3) Suspension wire rope grade shall be at least improved plow steel or equivalent.

(4) Suspension wire ropes shall be sized to conform with the required design factor, but shall not be less than 5/16 inch in diameter.

(5) No more than one reverse bend in six wire rope lays shall be permitted.

(6) A corrosion-resistant tag shall be securely attached to one of the wire rope fastenings when a suspension wire rope is to be used at a specific location and will remain in that location. This tag shall bear the following wire rope data:

  1. The diameter (inches);
  2. Construction classification;
  3. Whether non-preformed or preformed;
  4. The grade of material;
  5. The manufacturer’s rated strength;
  6. The manufacturer’s name;
  7. The month and year the ropes were installed; and
  8. The name of the person or company which installed the ropes.

(7) A new tag shall be installed at each rope renewal.

(8) The original tag shall be stamped with the date of the resocketing, or the original tag shall be retained and a supplemental tag shall be provided when ropes are resocketed. The supplemental tag shall show the date of resocketing and the name of the person or company that resocketed the rope.

(9) Winding drum type hoists shall contain at least three wraps of the suspension wire rope on the drum when the suspended unit has reached the lowest possible point of its vertical travel.

(10) Traction drum and sheave type hoists shall be provided with a wire rope of sufficient length to reach the lowest possible point of vertical travel of the suspended unit, and an additional length of the wire rope of at least four feet.

(11) The lengthening or repairing of suspension wire ropes is prohibited.

(12) Babbitted fastenings for suspension wire ropes are prohibited.

(h) Control Circuits, Power Circuits and Their Components.

(1) Electrical wiring and equipment shall comply with the Electrical Safety Orders, except as otherwise required by this section.

(2) Electrical runway conductor systems shall be of a type designed for use in exterior locations, and shall be located so that they do not come into contact with accumulated snow or water.

(3) Cables shall be protected against damage resulting from over-tensioning or from other causes.

(4) Devices shall be included in the control system for the equipment which will provide protection against electrical overloads, three phase reversal and phase failure. The control system shall have a separate method, independent of the direction control circuit, for breaking the power circuit in case of an emergency or malfunction.

(5) Suspended or supported equipment shall have a control system which will require the operator of the equipment to follow predetermined procedures.

(6) The following requirements shall apply to electrical protection devices:

(A) On installations where the carriage does not have a stability factor of at least four against overturning, electrical contact(s) shall be provided and so connected that the operating devices for the suspended or supported equipment shall be operative only when the carriage is located and mechanically retained at an established operating point.

(B) Overload protection shall be provided in the hoisting or suspension system to protect against the equipment operating in the “up” direction with a load in excess of 125 percent of the rated load of the platform; and

(C) An automatic detector shall be provided for each suspension point that will interrupt power to all hoisting motors for travel in the “down” direction, and apply the primary brakes if any suspension wire rope becomes slack. A continuous-pressure rigging-bypass switch designed for use during rigging is permitted. This switch shall only be used during rigging.

(7) Upper and lower directional switches designed to prevent the travel of suspended units beyond safe upward and downward levels shall be provided.

(8) Emergency stop switches shall be provided on remote controlled, roof-powered platforms adjacent to each control station on the platform.

(9) Cables which are in constant tension shall have overload devices which will prevent the tension in the cable from interfering with the load limiting device required in Section 3295(h)(6)(B) or with the platform roll limiting device required in Section 3295(e)(2)(C). The setting of these devices shall be coordinated with other overload settings at the time of design of the system, and shall be clearly indicated on or near the device. The device shall interrupt the equipment travel in the “down” direction. (Title 24, Part 2, 2-8522)

Note: Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code.

HISTORY
  1. Repealer and new section filed 3-9-93; operative 4-8-93 (Register 93, No. 11). For prior history, see Register 85, No. 40.
  2. Change without regulatory effect amending subsection (c)(2)(A) filed 9-13-95 pursuant to section 100, title 1, California Code of Regulations (Register 95, No. 37).
  3. Change without regulatory effect amending subsections (c)(2)(J) and (c)(2)(L) filed 10-23-95 pursuant to section 100, title 1, California Code of Regulations (Register 95, No. 43).
  4. Amendment of subsections (c)(3)(A), (c)(3)(B)2., and (c)(3)(C)1.-2., redesignation and amendment of subsections (c)(3)(D)1.-5. as subsections (c)(3)(E)-(F) and (c)(3)(H)-(J), new subsection (c)(3)(G) and amendment of Note filed 3-27-2007; operative 4-26-2007 (Register 2007, No. 13).
  5. Editorial correction of subsection (d)(6) (Register 2007, No. 32).
  6. Change without regulatory effect amending subsection (c)(2)(L) filed 2-28-2019 pursuant to section 100, title 1, California Code of Regulations (Register 2019, No. 9).

 

3296.Inspection and Tests – Title 8, Article 6.Powered Platforms and Equipment for Building Maintenance

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(a) Installations and Alterations. All completed building maintenance equipment installations shall be inspected and tested in the field before being placed in initial service to determine that all parts of the installation conform to applicable requirements of this article, and that all safety and operating equipment is functioning as required. A similar inspection and test shall be made following any major alteration to an existing installation.

(1) No hoist in an installation shall be subjected to a load in excess of 125 percent of its rated load.

(2) The building owner shall keep a certification record of each inspection and test required under subsection (a) of this section. The certification record shall include the date of the inspection, the signature of the person who performed the inspection, and the number, or other identifier, of the building support structure and equipment which was inspected. This certification record shall be kept readily available for review by the Division and by the employer.

(b) Periodic Inspections and Tests.

(1) Each installation shall undergo a periodic inspection and test at least every 12 months by the equipment manufacturer, authorized representative, or other qualified person acceptable to the Division. All parts of the equipment, including related building support structures, shall be inspected, and where necessary, tested to determine that they are in safe operating condition.

(2) The building owner shall keep a certification record of each inspection and test required under subsection (b) of this section. The certification record shall include the date of the inspection, the signature of the person who performed the inspection, and the number, or other identifier, of the building support structure and equipment which was inspected. This certification record shall be kept readily available for review by the Division and by the employer.

(3) Building safety devices and equipment as described in Section 3282(p)(1)(A) shall be load tested if damage, corrosion or deterioration affecting the load bearing integrity of building safety devices and equipment is detected or suspected.

(A) The safety device or equipment shall be removed from service until repaired or replaced if testing indicates that the load sustaining integrity of a safety device or equipment has been compromised.

(B) A professional engineer experienced in the design of building safety devices and equipment shall inspect and evaluate such equipment when any of the following occur:

  1. The design documents are not available;
  2. The design is deficient; or
  3. Inspections or tests determine that the safety devices or equipment are not safe for use.

(C) Damage to safety devices or equipment, or damage to the building structure from testing operations shall be reported to the building owner.

(D) If safety deficiencies affecting the load bearing integrity of devices or equipment have not been corrected within 60 days from the date the building owner was notified, the deficiencies shall be reported to the Division by the inspecting agency contracted to perform inspections and/or testing.

(4)(A) Load suspension devices shall not be tested to more than 2 times the rated working load which the device is designed to lift and/or support.

(B) Roof tie-backs shall be tested to no more than 50 percent of their rated capacity. For example, a roof tie-back with a rated capacity of 5000 pounds shall not be tested in excess of 2500 pounds.

(5) Test equipment shall be calibrated at least annually and calibration records shall be available to the Division.

(6) The load testing methodology and load testing procedures for a building’s safety devices and equipment shall be prescribed, in writing, by a professional engineer and load tests shall be performed by qualified persons under the direction of the engineer.

(7) Working platforms and their components shall be inspected by the employer for visible defects before every use and after each occurrence which could affect the platform’s structural integrity.

(c) Maintenance Inspections and Tests.

(1) A maintenance inspection and, where necessary a test shall be made of each platform installation prior to the start of a work cycle and where the work cycle is more than 30 days, such inspection and/or test shall be made at least every 30 days during the work cycle. This inspection and test shall follow procedures recommended by the manufacturer, and shall be made by a qualified person.

(2) The building owner shall keep a certification record of each inspection and test performed under subsection (c)(1) of this section. The certification record shall include the date of the inspection and test, the signature of the person who performed the inspection and/or test, and an identifier for the platform installation which was inspected. The certification record shall be kept readily available for review by the Division and by the employer.

(d) Special Inspection of Governors and Secondary Brakes.

(1) Governors and secondary brakes shall be inspected and tested at intervals specified by the manufacturer/supplier but not to exceed every 12 months.

(2) The results of the inspection and test shall confirm that the initiating device for the secondary braking system operates at the proper overspeed.

(3) The results of the inspection and test shall confirm that the secondary brake is functioning properly.

(4) If any hoisting machine or initiating device for the secondary brake system is removed from the equipment for testing, all reinstalled and directly related components shall be reinspected prior to returning the equipment installation to service.

(5) Inspection of governors and secondary brakes shall be performed by a qualified person.

(6) The secondary brake governor and actuation device shall be tested before each day’s use. Where testing is not feasible, a visual inspection of the brake shall be made to ensure that it is free to operate.

(e) Suspension Wire Rope Maintenance, Inspection and Replacement.

(1) Suspension wire rope shall be maintained and used in accordance with procedures recommended by the wire rope manufacturer.

(2) Suspension wire rope shall be inspected by a qualified person for visible defects and gross damage to the rope before every use and after each occurrence which might affect the wire rope’s integrity.

(3) A thorough inspection of suspension wire ropes in service shall be made once a month. Suspension wire ropes that have been inactive for 30 days or longer shall have a thorough inspection before they are placed into service. These thorough inspections of suspension wire ropes shall be performed by a qualified person.

(4) The need for replacement of a suspension wire rope shall be determined by inspection and shall be based on the condition of the wire rope. Any of the following conditions or combination of conditions will be cause for removal of the wire rope:

(A) Broken wires exceeding three wires in one strand or six wires in one rope lay;

(B) Distortion of rope structure such as would result from crushing or kinking;

(C) Evidence of heat damage;

(D) Evidence of rope deterioration from corrosion;

(E) A broken wire within 18 inches of the end attachments;

(F) Noticeable rusting and/or pitting;

(G) Evidence of core failure (a lengthening of rope lay, protrusion of the rope core and a reduction in rope diameter suggests core failure); or

(H) More than one valley break (broken wire);

(I) Outer wire wear exceeds one-third of the original outer wire diameter;

(J) Any other condition which the qualified person determines has significantly affected the integrity of the rope.

(5) The building owner shall keep a certification record of each monthly inspection of a suspension wire rope as required in subsection (e)(3) of this section. The record shall include the date of the inspection, the signature of the person who performed the inspection, and a number, or other identifier of the wire rope which was inspected. This record of inspection shall be made available for review by the Division and by the employer.

(f) Hoist Inspection. Before lowering personnel below the top elevation of the building, the hoist shall be tested each day in the lifting direction with the intended load to make certain it has sufficient capacity to raise the personnel back to the boarding level.

Note: Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code.
HISTORY
  1. Repealer and and new section filed 3-9-93; operative 4-8-93 (Register 93, No. 11). For prior history, see Register 85, No. 40.
  2. New subsections (a)(1)-(2), amendment of subsection (b)(2), new subsections (b)(3)-(b)(6), subsection renumbering and amendment ofNote filed 3-27-2007; operative 4-26-2007 (Register 2007, No. 13).

 

3297.Maintenance – Title 8, Article 6.Powered Platforms and Equipment for Building Maintenance

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(a) General Maintenance. All parts of the equipment affecting safe operation shall be maintained in proper working order so that they may perform the functions for which they were intended. The equipment shall be taken out of service when any part is not in proper working order.

(b) Cleaning.

(1) Control or power contractors and relays shall be kept clean.

(2) All other parts shall be kept clean if their proper functioning would be affected by the presence of dirt or other contaminants.

(c) Periodic Resocketing of Wire Rope Fastenings.

(1) Hoisting ropes utilizing poured socket fastenings shall be resocketed at the non-drum ends at intervals not exceeding 24 months. In resocketing the ropes, a sufficient length shall be cut from the end of the rope to remove damaged or fatigued portions.

(2) Resocketed ropes shall conform to the requirements of Section 3295(g).

(3) Limit switches affected by the resocketed ropes shall be reset, if necessary.

(d) Periodic Reshackling of Suspension Wire Ropes. The hoisting ropes shall be reshackled at the nondrum ends at intervals not exceeding 24 months. When reshackling the ropes, a sufficient length shall be cut from the end of the rope to remove damaged or fatigued portions.

(e) Roof Systems. Roof track systems, tie-downs, or similar equipment shall be maintained in proper working order so that they perform the function for which they were intended.

(f) Building Face Guiding Members. T-rails, indented mullions, or equivalent guides located in the face of a building shall be maintained in proper working order so that they perform the functions for which they were intended. Brackets for cable stabilizers shall similarly be maintained in proper working order.

(g) Inoperative Safety Devices. No person shall render a required safety device or electrical protective device inoperative, except as necessary for tests, inspections, and maintenance. Immediately upon completion of such tests, inspections and maintenance, the device shall be restored to its normal operating condition.

NOTE: Authority cited: Section 142.3, LaborCode. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code.

HISTORY
  1. Repealer and and new section filed 3-9-93; operative 4-8-93 (Register 93, No. 11). For prior history, see Register 83, No. 41.

3298.Operations – Title 8, Article 6.Powered Platforms and Equipment for Building Maintenance

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(a) Training.

(1) Working platforms shall be operated only by qualified persons who are proficient in the operation, safe use and inspection of the particular working platform to be operated.

(2) All employees who operate working platforms shall be trained in the following:

(A) Recognition of, and preventive measures for, the safety hazards associated with their individual work tasks.

(B) General recognition and prevention of safety hazards associated with the use of working platforms, including the provisions in the article relating to the particular working platform to be operated.

(C) Emergency action plan procedures required in Section 3294(i).

(D) Work procedures required in subsection (a)(4) of this section.

(E) Personal fall arrest system inspection care, use and system performance.

(3) Training of employees in the operation and inspection of working platforms shall be done by a qualified person.

(4) Written work procedures for the operation, safe use and inspection of working platforms shall be provided for employee training. Pictorial methods of instruction, may be used, in lieu of written work procedures, if employee communication is improved using this method. The operating manuals supplied by manufacturers for platform system components can serve as the basis for these procedures.

(5) The employer shall certify that employees have been trained in operating and inspecting a working platform by preparing a certification record which includes the identity of the person trained, the signature of the employer or the person who conducted the training and the date that training was completed. The certification record shall be prepared at the completion of the training required in subsection (a)(2) of this section, and shall be maintained in a file for the duration of the employee’s employment. The certification record shall be kept readily available for review by the Division.

(b) Use.

(1) Working platforms shall not be loaded in excess of the rated load, as stated on the platform load rating plate.

(2) Employees shall be prohibited from working on snow, ice, or other slippery material covering platforms, except for the removal of such materials.

(3) Adequate precautions shall be taken to protect the platform, wire ropes and safety lines from damage due to acids or other corrosive substances, in accordance with the recommendations of the corrosive substance producer, supplier, platform manufacturer or other equivalent information sources. Platform members which have been exposed to acids or other corrosive substances shall be washed down with a neutralizing solution, at a frequency recommended by the corrosive substance producer or supplier.

(4) Platform members, supporting members constructed of aluminum, wire ropes and safety lines shall be protected when using a heat producing process. Wire ropes and safety lines which have been contacted by the heat producing process shall be considered to be permanently damaged and shall not be used.

(5) The platform shall not be operated in winds in excess of 25 miles per hour except to move it from an operating to a storage position. Wind speed shall be determined based on the best available information, which includes on-site anemometer readings and local weather forecasts which predict wind velocities for the area.

(6) On exterior installations, an anemometer shall be mounted on the platform to provide information of onsite wind velocities prior to and during the use of the platform. The anemometer may be a portable (hand held) unit which is temporarily mounted during platform use.

(7) Tools, materials and debris not related to the work in progress shall not be allowed to accumulate on platforms. Stabilizer ties shall be located so as to allow unencumbered passage along the full length of the platform and shall be of such length so as not to become entangled in rollers, hoists or other machinery.

NOTE: Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code.

HISTORY
  1. Repealer and and new section filed 3-9-93; operative 4-8-93 (Register 93, No. 11). For prior history, see Register 85, No. 40.

3299.Personal Fall Protection – Title 8, Article 6.Powered Platforms and Equipment for Building Maintenance

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Employees on working platforms shall be protected by a personal fall arrest system meeting the requirements of Appendix C, Section I of this article, and as otherwise provided by these orders.

Note: Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code.

HISTORY
  1. New section and Appendices A-E filed 3-9-93; operative 4-8-93 (Register 93, No. 11).
  2. Change without regulatory effect amending Appendices A and D filed 9-13-95 pursuant to section 100, title 1, California Code of Regulations (Register 95, No. 37).
  3. Change without regulatory effect amending first paragraph of Appendix D filed 9-11-96 pursuant to section 100, title 1, California Code of Regulations (Register 96, No. 37).
  4. Amendment of appendix C filed 3-31-2000; operative 4-30-2000 (Register 2000, No. 13).
  5. Change without regulatory effect providing more legible figures 1, 2 and 3 within appendix B with no change therein filed 6-22-2000 pursuant to section 100, title 1, California Code of Regulations (Register 2000, No. 25).
  6. Change without regulatory effect providing more legible figures 1-3 within appendix B filed 2-9-2009 pursuant to section 100, title 1, California Code of Regulations (Register 2009, No. 7).
  7. Change without regulatory effect providing more legible illustration for Figure 2 within Appendix B filed 3-2-2009 pursuant to section 100, title 1, California Code of Regulations (Register 2009, No. 10).

 

Appendix A – Title 8, Article 6.Powered Platforms and Equipment for Building Maintenance

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  1. Use of the Appendix. Appendix A provides examples of equipment and methods to assist the employer in meeting the requirements of the indicated provision of the standard. Employers may use other equipment or procedures which conform to the requirements of the standard. This appendix neither adds to nor detracts from the mandatory requirements set forth in Article 6.
  2. Assurance. Section 3292(c) requires the building owner to inform the employer in writing that the powered platform installation complies with certain requirements of the article, since the employer may not have the necessary information to make these determinations. The employer, however, remains responsible for meeting these requirements which have not been set off in Section 3292(c)(1).
  3. Design Requirements. The design requirements for each installation should be based on the limitations (stresses, deflections, etc.), established by nationally recognized standards as promulgated by the following organizations, or to equivalent standards:

AA-The Aluminum Association
818 Connecticut Avenue, N.W.
Washington, DC 20006
Aluminum Construction Manual
Specifications For Aluminum Structures
Aluminum Standards and Data

AGMA-American Gear Manufacturers Association
101 North Fort Meyer Dr., Suite 1000
Arlington, VA 22209

AISC-American Institute of Steel
Construction
400 North Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL 60611

ANSI-American National Standards Institute, Inc.
11 West 42nd Street
New York City, NY 10036

ASCE-American Society of Civil Engineers
345 East 47th Street
New York, NY 10017

ASME-American Society of Mechanical Engineers
345 East 47th Street
New York, NY 10017

ASTM-American Society for Testing and Materials
1916 Race Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103

AWS-American Welding Society, Inc.
Box 351040, 550 NW LeJeunne Road
Miami, FL 33126

JIC-Joint Industrial Council
2139 Wisconsin Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20007

NEMA-National Electric Manufacturers Association
2101 L Street, NW
Washington, DC 20037

  1. Tie-in Guides. Indented mullions, T-rails or other equivalent guides are acceptable as tie-in guides in a building face for a continuous stabilization system. Internal guides are embedded in other building members with only the opening exposed (see Figure 1 of Appendix B). External guides, however, are installed external to the other building members and so are fully exposed. The minimum opening for tie-in guides is three-quarters of an inch, and the minimum inside dimensions are one-inch deep and two inches wide.

Employers should be aware of the hazards associated with tie-in guides in a continuous stabilization system which was not designed properly. For example, joints in these track systems may become extended or discontinuous due to installation, building settlement or flexing. If this problem is not corrected, the system could lam when a guide roller shoe strikes a joint or distorted area and this would cause a hazardous situation. In another instance, faulty design will result in guide rollers being mounted in a line so they will jam in the track at the slightest misalignment.

  1. Building Anchors (Intermittent Stabilization System). In the selection of the vertical distance between building anchors, certain factors should be given consideration. These factors include building height and architectural design, platform length and weight, wire rope angulation, and the wind velocities in the building area. Another factor to consider is the material of the building face, since this material may be adversely affected by the building rollers.

External or indented type building anchors are acceptable. Receptacles in the building facade used for the indented type should be kept clear of extraneous materials which will hinder their use. During the inspection or use of the platform system, evidence of a failure or abuse of the anchors should be brought to the attention of the employer.

  1. Stabilizer Tie Length. A stabilizer tie should be long enough to provide for the planned angulation of the suspension cables. However, the length of the tie should not be excessive and become a problem by possibly becoming entangled in the building face rollers or parts of the platform machinery.

The attachment length may vary due to material elongation and this should be considered when selecting the material to be used. Consideration should also be given to the use of ties which are easily installed by employees, since this will encourage their use.

  1. Intermittent Stabilization System. Intermittent stabilization systems may use different equipment, tie-in devices and methods to restrict the horizontal movement of a powered platform with respect to the face of the building. One acceptable method employs corrosion-resistant building anchors secured in the face of the building in vertical rows every third floor or 50 feet, whichever is less. The anchors are spaced horizontally to allow a stabilization attachment (stabilizer tie) for each of the two platform suspension wire ropes. The stabilizer tie consists of two parts. One part is a quick connect-quick disconnect device which utilizes a corrosion-resistant yoke and retainer spring that is designed to fit over the building anchors. The second part of the stabilizer tie is a lanyard which is used to maintain a fixed distance between the suspension wire rope and the face of the building.

In this method, as the suspended powered platform descends past the elevation of each anchor, the descent is halted and each of the platform occupants secures a stabilizer tie between a suspension wire rope and a building anchor. The procedure is repeated as each elevation of a building anchor is reached during the descent of the powered platform.

As the platform ascends, the procedure is reversed; that is, the stabilizer ties are removed as each elevation of a building anchor is reached. The removal of each stabilizer tie is assured since the platform is provided with stopping devices which will interrupt power to its hoist(s) in the event either stopping device contacts a stabilizer during the ascent of the platform.

Figure 2 of Appendix B illustrates another type of acceptable intermittent stabilization system which utilizes retaining pins as the quick connect-quick disconnect device in the stabilizer tie. Intermittent stabilization anchors shall both be located outboard, in line with, or inboard of suspension ropes. A combination of locations at the same level shall not be allowed.

  1. Wire Rope Inspection. The inspection of the suspension wire rope is important since the rope gradually loses strength during its useful life. The purpose of the inspection is to determine whether the wire rope has sufficient integrity to support a platform with the required design factor.

If there is any doubt concerning the condition of a wire rope or its ability to perform the required work, the rope should be replaced. The cost of wire rope replacement is quite small if compared to the cost in terms of human injuries, equipment down time and replacement.

No listing of critical inspection factors, which serve as a basis for wire rope replacement in the standard, can be a substitute for an experienced inspector of wire rope. The listing serves as a user’s guide to the accepted standards by which ropes must be judged.

Rope life can be prolonged if preventive maintenance is performed regularly. Cutting off an appropriate length of rope at the end termination before the core degrades and valley breaks appear minimizes degradation at these sections.

  1. General Maintenance. In meeting the general maintenance requirement in Section 3297, the employer should undertake the prompt replacement of broken, worn and damaged parts, switch contacts, brushes, and short flexible conductors of electrical devices. The components of the electrical service system and traveling cables should be replaced when damaged or significantly abraded. In addition, gears, shafts, bearings, brakes and hoisting drums should be kept in proper alignment. For a stabilization system to be effective, the building face rollers cannot be dirty or greasy and shall be kept clean.
  2. Training. In meeting the training requirement of Section 3298, employers should use both on the job training and formal classroom training. The written work procedures used for this training should be obtained from the manufacturer, if possible, or prepared as necessary for the employee’s information and use.

Employees who will operate powered platforms with intermittent stabilization systems should receive instruction in the specific ascent and descent procedures involving the assembly and disassembly of the stabilizer ties.

An acceptable training program should also include employee instruction in basic inspection procedures for the purpose of determining the need for repair and replacement of platform equipment. In addition, the program should cover the inspection, care and use of the personal fall protection equipment required in Section 3299.

In addition, the training program should also include an emergency action plan as specified in Section 3220 of the General Industry Safety Orders.

Following the completion of a training program, the employee should be required to demonstrate competency in operating the equipment safely. Supplemental training of the employee should be provided by the employer, as necessary, if the equipment used or other working conditions should change.

An employee who is required to work with chemical products on a platform should receive training in proper cleaning procedures, and in the hazards, care and handling of these products. In addition, the employee should be supplied with the appropriate personal protective equipment, such as gloves and eye and face protection.

  1. Suspension and Securing of Powered Platforms (Equivalency). One acceptable method of demonstrating the equivalency of a method of suspending or securing a powered platform, as required in Sections 3294(b)(3), 3295(c) and (e)(1)(F), is to provide an engineering analysis by a professional engineer currently registered in the State of California. The analysis should demonstrate that the proposed method will provide an equal or greater degree of safety for employees than any one of the methods specified in the standard.

NOTE: Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code; and Section 18943(c), Health and Safety Code.

 

Appendix B – Title 8, Article 6.Powered Platforms and Equipment for Building Maintenance

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Exhibits (Advisory).

The three drawings in Appendix B illustrate typical platform stabilization systems which are addressed in the standard. The drawings are to be used for reference purposes only, and do not illustrate all the mandatory requirements for each system.
Note: Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code; and Section 18943(c), Health and Safety Code.

Figure 1. Typical Self-Powered Platform -Continuous External or Indented Mullion Guide System

OSHA Illustration - Continuous External or Indented Mullion Guide System

 

Figure 2. Typical Self-Powered Platform – Intermittent Tie-In System

 

Figure 3. Typical Self-Powered Platform – Button Guide System

OSHA illustration - Button Guide System

 

Note: Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code; and Section 18943(c), Health and Safety Code.

 

Appendix C – Title 8, Article 6.Powered Platforms and Equipment for Building Maintenance

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Personal Fall Arrest System
(Sections I and II-Mandatory);
(Section III Non-Mandatory).

Use of the Appendix

Section I of Appendix C sets out the criteria for personal fall arrest systems used by all employees using powered platforms, as required by Section 3299. Section II sets out test procedures which shall be used to determine compliance with applicable requirements contained in Section I of this Appendix. Section III provides non-mandatory guidelines which are intended to assist employers in complying with these provisions.

  1. Personal Fall Arrest Systems.

(a) Scope and Application. This section establishes the application of and performance criteria for personal fall arrest systems which are required for use by all employees using powered platforms under Article 6.

(b) Definitions. Definitions that apply to terms used in Appendix C are located in Article 5, Section 3281.

(c) Design for System Components.

(1) Connectors shall be drop forged, pressed or formed steel, or made of equivalent materials.

(2) Connectors shall have a corrosion-resistant finish, and all surfaces and edges shall be smooth to prevent damage to interfacing parts of the system.

(3) Lanyards and vertical safety lines which tie-off one employee shall have a minimum breaking strength of 5,000 pounds. All ends shall be spliced or swaged as per the manufacturer’s specifications. Knots shall not be permitted at ends or anywhere along the length of the lanyard or “safety line”.

(4) Self-retracting safety lines and lanyards which automatically limit free fall distance to two feet or less shall have components capable of sustaining a minimum static tensile load of 3,000 pounds applied to the device with the safety line or lanyard in the fully extended position.

(5) Self-retracting safety lines and lanyards which do not limit free fall distance to two feet or less, ripstitch lanyards, and tearing and deforming lanyards shall be capable of sustaining a minimum tensile load of 5,000 pounds applied to the device with the safety line or lanyard in the fully extended position.

(6) Dee-rings and snap-hooks shall be capable of sustaining a minimum tensile load of 5,000 pounds.

(7) Dee-rings and snap-hooks shall be 100 percent proof-tested to a minimum tensile load of 3,600 pounds without cracking, breaking, or taking permanent deformation.

(8) Snap-hooks shall be sized to be compatible with the member to which they are connected. Only double-acting snap-hooks designed to prevent accidental disengagement shall be used.

(9) Horizontal safety lines, where used, shall be designed under the supervision of a professional engineer currently registered in the State of California and installed as part of a complete personal fall arrest system, which maintains a safety factor of at least two.

(10) Anchorages to which personal fall arrest equipment is attached shall be capable of supporting at least 5,000 pounds per employee attached, or shall be designed under the supervision of a professional engineer currently registered in the State of California and installed and used as part of a complete personal fall arrest system which maintains a safety factor of at least two.

(11) Ropes and straps (webbing) used in lanyards, safety lines, and strength components of body harnesses, shall be made from synthetic fibers or wire rope.

(12) All body harnesses and lanyards manufactured on or before January 1, 1998, shall be designed and built to conform to ANSI A10.14-1975, Requirements for Safety Belts, Harnesses, Lanyards, Lifelines and Drop Lines for Construction and Industrial Use, which is hereby incorporated by reference.

(13) All personal fall arrest, personal fall restraint and positioning device systems manufactured after January 1, 1998, shall be designed and built to conform to either ANSI A10.14-1991 American National Standard for Construction and Demolition Use, or ANSI Z359.1-1992 American National Standard Safety Requirements for Personal Fall Arrest Systems, Subsystems and Components, which are hereby incorporated by reference.

(d) System Performance Criteria.

(1) Personal fall arrest systems shall, when stopping a fall:

(A) Limit maximum arresting force on an employee to 1,800 pounds when used with a body harness;

(B) Bring an employee to a complete stop and limit maximum deceleration distance an employee travels to 3.5 feet; and (C)Have sufficient strength to withstand twice the potential impact energy of an employee free falling a distance of six feet, or the free fall distance permitted by the system, whichever is less.

(2)(A) When used by employees having a combined person and tool weight of less than 310 pounds, personal fall arrest systems which meet the criteria and protocols contained in paragraphs (b), (c) and (d) in Section II of this Appendix shall be considered as complying with the provisions of subparagraphs (d)(1)(A) through (d)(1)(C) above.

(B) When used by employees having a combined tool and body weight of 310 pounds or more, personal fall arrest systems which meet the criteria and protocols contained in paragraphs (b), (c) and (d) in Section II may be considered as complying with the provisions of subparagraphs (d)(l)(A) through (d)(1)(C), provided that the criteria and protocols are modified appropriately to provide proper protection for such heavier weights.

(e) Care and Use.

(1) Body belts shall not be used as part of a personal fall arrest system.

(2) Devices used to connect to a horizontal safety line which may become a vertical safety line shall be capable of locking in either direction on the safety line.

(3) Personal fall arrest systems shall be rigged such that an employee can neither free fall more than six feet, nor contact any lower level obstacle.

(4) The attachment point of the body belt shall be located in the center of the wearer’s back. The attachment point of the body harness shall be located in the center of the wearer’s back near shoulder level or above the wearer’s head.

(5) When vertical safety lines are used, each employee shall be provided with a separate safety line.

(6) Personal fall arrest systems or components shall be used only for employee fall protection.

(7) Personal fall arrest systems or components subjected to impact loading shall be immediately removed from service and shall not be used again for employee protection until repaired or replaced. Repaired or replaced components or component parts shall meet the performance and testing requirements of this appendix.

(8) The employer shall provide for prompt rescue of employees in the event of a fall or shall assure the self-rescue capability of employees.

(9) Before using a personal fall arrest system, and after any component or system is changed, employees shall be trained in accordance with the requirements of Secton 3298 in the safe use of the system.

(f) Inspections.

(1) Personal fall arrest systems shall be inspected prior to each use for mildew, wear, damage and other deterioration, and defective components shall be removed from service if their strength or function may be adversely affected.

(2) Each personal fall arrest system shall be inspected not less than twice annually by a competent person in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations. The date of each inspection shall be documented

NOTE: Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code; and Section 18943(c), Health and Safety Code.

  1. Test Methods for Personal Fall Arrest Systems.

(a) General. Paragraphs (b), (c), (d) and (e) of this Section II set forth test procedures which shall be used to determine compliance with requirements in subparagraphs (d)(1)(A) through d)(1)(D) of Section I of this Appendix.

(b) General conditions for all tests in Section II.

(1) Safety lines, lanyards and deceleration devices shall be attached to an anchorage and connected to the body harness in the same manner as they would be when used to protect employees.

(2) The anchorage shall be rigid, and shall not have a deflection greater than .04 inches when a force of 2,250 pounds is applied.

(3) The frequency response of the load measuring instrumentation shall be 120 Hz.

(4) The test weight used in the strength and force tests shall be a rigid, metal, cylindrical or torso-shaped object with a girth of 38 inches plus or minus four inches.

(5) The lanyard or safety line used to create the free fall distance shall be supplied with the system, or in its absence, the least elastic lanyard or safety line available to be used with the system.

(6) The test weight for each test shall be hoisted to the required level and shall be quickly released without having any appreciable motion imparted to it.

(7) The system’s performance shall be evaluated taking into account the range of environmental conditions for which it is designed to be used.

(8) Following the test, the system need not be capable of further operation.

(c) Strength Test.

(1) During the testing of all systems, a test weight of 300 pounds plus or minus five pounds shall be used. (See subparagraph (b)(4), above.)

(2) The test consists of dropping the test weight once. A new unused system shall be used for each test.

(3) For lanyard systems, the lanyard length shall be six feet plus or minus two inches as measured from the fixed anchorage to the attachment on the body harness.

(4) For rope-grab-type deceleration systems, the length of the safety line above the centerline of the grabbing mechanism to the safety line’s anchorage point shall not exceed two feet.

(5) For lanyard systems, for systems with deceleration devices which do not automatically limit free fall distance to two feet or less, and for systems with deceleration devices which have a connection distance in excess of one foot (measured between the centerline of the safety line and the attachment point to the body belt or harness) the test weight shall be rigged to free fall a distance of 7.5 feet from a point that is 1.5 feet above the anchorage point, to its hanging location (six feet below the anchorage). The test weight shall fall without interference, obstruction, or hitting the floor or ground during the test. In some cases, a non-elastic wire lanyard of sufficient length may need to be added to the system (for test purposes) to create the necessary free fall distance.

(6) For deceleration device systems with integral safety lines or lanyards which automatically limit free fall distance to two feet or less, the test weight shall be rigged to free fall a distance of four feet.

(7) Any weight which detaches from the belt or harness shall constitute failure for the strength test.

(d) Force Test.

(1) General. The test consists of dropping the respective test weight specified subsection in (d)(2)(A) or (d)(3)(A) once. A new, unused system shall be used for each test.

(2) For lanyard systems.

(A) A test weight of 220 pounds plus or minus three pounds shall be used. (See subparagraph (b)(4), above.)

(B) Lanyard length shall be six feet plus or minus two inches as measured from the fixed anchorage to the attachment on the body harness.

(C) The test weight shall fall free from the anchorage level to its hanging location (a total of six feet free fall distance) without interference, obstruction, or hitting the floor or ground during the test.

(3) For all other systems. (A) A test weight of 220 pounds plus or minus three pounds shall be used. (See subparagraph (b)(4), above.)

(B) The free fall distance to be used in the test shall be the maximum fall distance physically permitted by the system during normal use conditions, up to a maximum free fall distance for the test weight of six feet, except as follows:

  1. For deceleration systems which have a connection link or lanyard, the test weight shall free fall a distance equal to the connection distance (measured between the centerline of the safety line and the attachment point to the body harness).
  2. For deceleration device systems with integral safety lines or lanyards which automatically limit free fall distance to two feet or less, the test weight shall free fall a distance equal to that permitted by the system in normal use. (For example, to test a system with a self-retracting safety line or lanyard, the test weight shall be supported and the system allowed to retract the safety line or lanyard as it would in normal use. The test weight would then be released and the force and deceleration distance measured).

(4) A system fails the force test if the recorded maximum arresting force exceeds 2,520 pounds when using a body harness.

(5) The maximum elongation and deceleration distance shall be recorded during the force test.

(e) Deceleration Device Tests.

(1) General. The device shall be evaluated or tested under the environmental conditions, (such as rain, ice, grease, dirt, type of safety line, etc.), for which the device is designed.

(2) Rope-grab-type deceleration devices.

(A) Devices shall be moved on a safety line 1,000 times over the same length of line a distance of not less than one foot, and the mechanism shall lock each time.

(B) Unless the device is permanently marked to indicate the type(s) of safety line which must be used, several types (different diameters and different materials) of safety lines shall be used to test the device.

(3) Other self-activating-type deceleration devices. The locking mechanisms of other self-activating-type deceleration devices designed for more than one arrest shall lock each of 1,000 times as they would in normal service.

NOTE: Authority cited: Section 142.3. Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code; and Section 18943(c). Health and Safety Code.

III. Non-Mandatory Guidelines for Personal Fall Arrest Systems. The following information constitutes additional guidelines for use in complying with requirements for a personal fall arrest system.

(a) Selection and Use Considerations. The kind of personal fall arrest system selected should match the particular work situation, and any possible free fall distance should be kept to a minimum. Consideration should be given to the particular work environment. For example, the presence of acids, dirt, moisture, oil, grease, etc., and their effect on the system should be evaluated. Hot or cold environments may also have an adverse affect on the system. Wire rope should not be used where an electrical hazard is anticipated. As required by the standard, the employer must plan to have means available to promptly rescue an employee should a fall occur, since the suspended employee may not be able to reach a work level independently.

Where lanyards, connectors, and safety lines are subject to damage by work operations such as welding, chemical cleaning, and sandblasting, the component should be protected or other securing systems should be used. The employer should fully evaluate the work conditions and environment (including seasonal weather changes) before selecting the appropriate personal fall protection system. Once in use, the system’s effectiveness should be monitored. In some cases, a program for cleaning and maintenance of the system may be necessary.

(b) Testing Considerations. Before purchasing or putting into use a personal fall arrest system, an employer should obtain from the supplier information about the system based on its performance during testing so that the employer can know if the system meets this standard. Testing should be done using recognized test methods.

Section II of this Appendix C contains test methods recognized for evaluating the performance of fall arrest systems. Not all systems may need to be individually tested; the performance of some systems may be based on data and calculations derived from testing of similar systems, provided that enough information is available to demonstrate similarity of function and design.

(c) Component Compatibility Considerations. Ideally, a personal fall arrest system is designed, tested, and supplied as a complete system. However, it is common practice for lanyards, connectors, safety lines, deceleration devices, and body harnesses to be interchanged since some components wear out before others. The employer and employee should realize that not all components are interchangeable. For instance, a lanyard should not be connected between a body harness and a deceleration device of the self-retracting type since this can result in additional free fall for which the system was not designed. Any substitution or change to a personal fall arrest system should be fully evaluated or tested by a qualified person to determine that it meets the standard, before the modified system is put in use.

(d) Employee Training Considerations.

Thorough employee training in the selection and use of personal fall arrest systems is imperative. As stated in the standard, before the equipment is used, employees must be trained in the safe use of the system. This should include the following: Application limits; proper anchoring and tie-off techniques; estimation of free fall distance, including determination of deceleration distance, and total fall distance to prevent striking a lower level; methods of use; and inspection and storage of the system. Careless or improper use of the equipment can result in serious injury or death. Employers and employees should become familiar with the material in this appendix, as well as manufacturer’s recommendations, before a system is used. Of uppermost importance is the reduction in strength caused by certain tie-offs (such as using knots, tying around sharp edges, etc.) and maximum permitted free fall distance. Also, to be stressed are the importance of inspections prior to use, the limitations of the equipment, and unique conditions at the worksite which may be important in determining the type of system to use.

(e) Instruction Considerations. Employers should obtain comprehensive instructions from the supplier as to the system’s proper use and application, including, where applicable:

(1) The force measured during the sample force test;

(2) The maximum elongation measured for lanyards during the force test;

(3) The deceleration distance measured for deceleration devices during the force test;

(4) Caution statements on critical use limitations;

(5) Application limits;

(6) Proper hook-up, anchoring and tie-off techniques, including the proper dee-ring or other attachment point to use on the body harness for fall arrest;

(7) Proper climbing techniques;

(8) Methods of inspection, use, cleaning, and storage; and

(9) Specific safety lines which may be used.

This information should be provided to employees during training.

(f) Inspection Considerations. As stated in the standard (Section I, paragraph (f)), personal fall arrest systems must be regularly inspected. Any component with any significant defect, such as cuts, tears, abrasions, mold, or undue stretching; alterations or additions which might affect its efficiency; damage due to deterioration; contact with fire, acids, or other corrosives; distorted hooks or faulty hook springs; tongues unfitted to the shoulder of buckles; loose or damaged mountings; non-functioning parts; or wearing or internal deterioration in the ropes must be withdrawn from service immediately, and should be tagged or marked as unusable, or destroyed.

(g) Rescue Considerations. As required by the standard (Section I, subparagraph (e)(8)), when personal fall arrest systems are used, the employer must assure that employees can be promptly rescued or can rescue themselves should a fall occur. The availability of rescue personnel, ladders or other rescue equipment should be evaluated. In some situations, equipment which allows employees to rescue themselves after the fall has been arrested may be desirable, such as devices which have descent capability.

(h) Tie-off Considerations.

(1) One of the most important aspects of personal fall protection systems is fully planning the system before it is put into use. Probably the most overlooked component is planning for suitable anchorage points. Such planning should ideally be done before the structure or building is constructed so that anchorage points can be incorporated during construction for use later for window cleaning or other building maintenance. If properly planned, these anchorage points may be used during construction, as well as afterwards.

(2) Employers and employees should at all times be aware that the strength of a personal fall arrest system is based on its being attached to an anchoring system which does not significantly reduce the strength of the system (such as properly dimensioned eye- bolt/snap-hook anchorage). Therefore, if a means of attachment is used that will reduce the strength of the system, that component should be replaced by a stronger one, but one that will also maintain the appropriate maximum arrest force characteristics.

(3) Tie-off using a knot in a rope lanyard or safety line (at any location) can reduce the safety line or lanyard strength by 50 percent or more. Therefore, a stronger lanyard or safety line should be used to compensate for the weakening effect of the knot, or the lanyard length should be reduced (or the tie-off location raised) to minimize free fall distance, or the lanyard or safety line should be replaced by one which has an appropriately incorporated connector to eliminate the need for a knot.

(4) Tie-off a rope lanyard or safety line around an “H” or “I” beam or similar support can reduce its strength as much as 70 percent due to the cutting action of the beam edges. Therefore, use should be made of a webbing lanyard or wire core safety lines around the beam; or the lanyard or safety line should be protected from the edge; or free fall distance should be greatly minimized.

(5) Tie-off where the line passes over or around rough or sharp surfaces reduces strength drastically. Such a tie-off should be avoided or an alternative tie-off rigging should be used. Such alternatives may include use of a snaphook/dee ring connection, wire rope tie-off, an effective padding of the surfaces, or an abrasion-resistance strap around or over the problem surface.

(6) Horizontal safety lines may, depending on their geometry and angle of sag, be subjected to greater loads than the impact load imposed by an attached component. When the angle of horizontal safety line sag is less than 30 degrees, the impact force imparted to the safety line by an attached lanyard is greatly amplified. For example, with a sag angle of 15 degrees, the force amplification is about 2:1 and at 5 degrees sag, it is about 6:1.

Depending on the angle of sag, and the line’s elasticity, the strength of the horizontal safety line and the anchorages to which it is attached should be increased a number of times over that of the lanyard. Extreme care should be taken in considering a horizontal safety line for multiple tie-offs. The reason for this is that in multiple tie-offs to a horizontal safety line, if one employee falls, the movement of the falling employee and the horizontal safety line during arrest of the fall may cause other employees to also fall. Horizontal safety line and anchorage strength should be increased for each additional employee to be tied-off. For these and other reasons, the design of systems using horizontal safety lines must only be done by qualified persons. Testing of installed safety lines and anchors prior to use is recommended.

(7) The strength of an eve-bolt is rated along the axis of the bolt and its strength is greatly reduced if the force is applied at an angle to this axis (in the direction of shear). Also, care should be exercised in selecting the proper diameter of the eye to avoid accidental disengagement of snap-hooks not designed to be compatible for the connection.

(8) Due to the significant reduction in the strength of the safety line/lanyard (in some cases, as much as a 70 percent reduction), the sliding hitch knot should not be used for safety line/lanyard connections except in emergency situations where no other available system is practical. The “one-and-one” sliding hitch knot should never be used because it is unreliable in stopping a fall. The “two-and-two” or “three-and-three” knot (preferable), may be used in emergency situations; however, care should be taken to limit free fall distance to a minimum because of reduced safety line/lanyard strength.

(i) Vertical Safety Line Considerations. As required by the standard, each employee must have a separate safety line when the safety line is vertical. The reason for this is that in multiple tie-offs to a single safety line, if one employee falls, the movement of the safety line during the arrest of the fall may pull other employees’ lanyards, causing them to fall as well.

(j) Free Fall Considerations. The employer and employee should at all times be aware that a system’s maximum arresting force is evaluated under normal use conditions established by the manufacturer, and in no case using a free fall distance in excess of six feet. A few extra feet of free fall can significantly increase the arresting force on the employee, possibly to the point of causing injury. Because of this, the free fall distance should be kept at a minimum, and, as required by the standard, in no case greater than six feet. To help assure this, the tie-off attachment point to the safety line or anchor should be located at or above the connection point of the fall arrest equipment to harness. (Since otherwise additional free fall distance is added to the length of the connecting means (i.e. lanyard)). Attaching to the working surface will often result in a free fall greater than six feet. For instance, if a six foot lanyard is used, the total free fall distance will be the distance from the working level to the body harness attachment point plus the six feet of lanyard length. Another important consideration is that the arresting force which the fall system must withstand also goes up with greater distance of free fall, possibly exceeding the strength of the system.

(k) Elongation and Deceleration Distance Considerations. Other factors involved in a proper tie-off are elongation and deceleration distance. During the arresting of a fall, a lanyard will experience a length of stretching or elongation, whereas activation of a deceleration device will result in a certain stopping distance. These distances should be available with the lanyard or device’s instructions and must be added to the free fall distance to arrive at the total fall distance before an employee is fully stopped. The additional stopping distance may be very significant if the lanyard or deceleration device is attached near or at the end of a long safety line, which may itself add considerable distance due to its own elongation. As required by the standard, sufficient distance to allow for all of these factors must also be maintained between the employee and obstructions below, to prevent an injury due to impact before the system fully arrests the fall. In addition, a minimum of 12 feet of safety line should be allowed below the securing point of a rope grab type deceleration device, and the end terminated to prevent the device from sliding off the safety line should extend to the ground or the next working level below. These measures are suggested to prevent the worker from inadvertently moving past the end of the safety line and having the rope grab become disengaged from the safety line.

(l) Obstruction Considerations. The location of the tie-off should also consider the hazard of obstructions in the potential fall path of the employee. Tie-offs which minimize the possibilities of exaggerated swinging should be considered.

(m) Other Considerations. Because of the design of some personal fall arrest systems, additional considerations may be required for proper tie-off. For example, heavy deceleration devices of the self-retracting type should be secured overhead in order to avoid the weight of the device having to be supported by the employee. Also, if self-retracting equipment is connected to a horizontal safety line, the sag in the safety line should be minimized to prevent the device from sliding down the safety line to a position which creates a swing hazard during fall arrest. In all cases, manufacturer’s instructions should be followed.

NOTE: Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section 142.3, Labor Code; and section 18943(c), Health and Safety Code.

Appendix D – Title 8, Article 6.Powered Platforms and Equipment for Building Maintenance

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Use of the Appendix

Appendix D sets out the mandatory building and equipment requirements for applicable permanent installations completed after September 29, 1974, and no later than July 1, 1993 which are exempt from Sections 3292(a), (b)(1), (c), 3293, 3294, and 3295 of Article 6. The requirements in Appendix D are essentially the same as unrevised building and equipment provisions which previously were designated Article 6 and which were effective on July 16, 1976. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8510(a).)

NOTE: All existing installations subject to this appendix shall also comply with Sections 3296, 3297, 3298, 3299 and Appendix C of Article 6.

(a) Definitions Applicable to this Appendix.

Angulated Roping. A system of platform suspension in which the upper wire rope sheaves or suspension points are closer to the plane of the building face than the corresponding attachment points on the platform, thus causing the platform to press against the face of the building during its vertical travel.

ANSI. American National Standards Institute.

Babbitted Fastenings. The method of providing wire rope attachments in which the ends of the wire strands are bent back and are held in a tapered socket by means of poured molten babbitt metal.

Brake-Disc Type. A brake in which the holding effect is obtained by frictional resistance between one or more faces of discs keyed to the rotating member to be held and fixed discs keyed to the stationary or housing member (pressure between the discs being applied axially).

Brake-Self-Energizing Band Type. An essentially unidirectional brake in which the holding effect is obtained by the snubbing action of a flexible band wrapped about a cylindrical wheel or drum affixed to the rotating member to be held, the connections and linkages being so arranged that the motion of the brake wheel or drum will act to increase the tension or holding force of the band.

Brake-Shoe Type. A brake in which the holding effect is obtained by applying the direct pressure of two or more segmental friction elements held to a stationary member against a cylindrical wheel or drum affixed to the rotating member to be held.

Building Face Rollers. A specialized form of guide roller designed to contact a portion of the outer face or wall structure of the building, and to assist in stabilizing the operators’ platform during vertical travel.

Continuous Pressure. Operation by means of buttons or switches, any one of which may be used to control the movement of the working platform or roof car, only as long as the button or switch is manually maintained in the actuating position.

Control. A system governing starting, stopping, direction, acceleration, speed, and retardation of moving members.

Controller. A device or group of devices, usually contained in a single enclosure, which serves to control in some predetermined manner the apparatus to which it is connected.

Electrical Ground. A conducting connection between an electrical circuit or equipment and the earth, or some conducting body which serves in place of the earth.

Guide Roller. A rotating, bearing-mounted, generally cylindrical member, operating separately or as part of a guide shoe assembly, attached to the platform, and providing rolling contact with building guideways, or other building contact members.

Guide Shoe. An assembly of rollers, slide members, or the equivalent, attached as a unit to the operators’ platform, and designed to engage with the building members provided for the vertical guidance of the operators’ platform.

Interlock. A device actuated by the operation of some other device with which it is directly associated, to govern succeeding operations of the same or allied devices.

Operating Device. A pushbutton, lever, or other manual device used to actuate a control.

Powered Platform. Equipment to provide access to the exterior of a building for maintenance, consisting of a suspended power-operated working platform, a roof car, or other suspension means, and the requisite operating and control devices.

Rated Load. The combined weight of employees, tools, equipment, and other material which the working platform is designed and installed to lift.

Relay, Direction. An electrically energized contactor responsive to an initiating control circuit, which in turn causes a moving member to travel in a particular direction.

Relay, Potential for Vertical Travel. An electrically energized contactor responsive to initiating control circuit, which in turn controls the operation of a moving member in both directions. This relay usually operates in conjunction with direction relays, as covered under the definition “relay, direction.”

Roof Car. A structure for the suspension of a working platform. providing for its horizontal movement to working positions.

Roof-Powered Platform. A powered platform having the raising and lowering mechanism located on a roof car.

Self-Powered Platform. A powered platform having the raising and lowering mechanism located on the working platform.

Traveling Cable. A cable made up of electrical or communication conductors or both, and providing electrical connection between the working platform and the roof car or other fixed point.

Weatherproof. Equipment so constructed or protected that exposure to the weather will not interfere with its proper operation.

Working Platform. The suspended structure arranged for vertical travel which provides access to the exterior of the building or structure.

Yield Point. The stress at which the material exhibits a permanent set of 0.2 percent.

Zinced Fastenings. The method of providing wire rope attachments in which the splayed or fanned wire ends are held in a tapered socket by means of poured molten zinc. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8510(b).)

(b) General Requirements.

(1) Design requirements. All powered platform installations for exterior building maintenance completed as of September 29, 1974, but no later than July 1, 1993, shall meet all of the design, construction and installation requirements of Part II and III of the “American National Standard Safety Requirements for Powered Platforms for Exterior Building Maintenance. ANSI A120.1-1970”, which is hereby incorporated by reference, and of this appendix. All powered platform installations installed prior to September 29, 1974 shall be maintained as required by Appendix D. References shall be made to appropriate parts of ANSI A120.1-1970 for detail specifications for equipment and special installations. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2- 8511(b).)

(2) Limitation. The requirements of this appendix apply only to electric powered platforms. It is not the intent of the appendix to prohibit the use of other types of power. Installation of powered platforms using other types of power is permitted, provided such platforms have adequate protective devices for the type of power used, and otherwise provided for reasonable safety of life and limb to users of equipment and to others who may be exposed. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8511(c).)

(3) Types of Powered Platforms. (A) For the purpose of applying this appendix, powered platforms are divided into two basic types. Type F and Type T. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8511(d)1.)

(B) Powered platforms designated as Type F shall meet all the requirements in Part II of the ANSI A 120.1-1970. American National Standard Safety Requirements for Powered Platforms for Exterior Building Maintenance, which is hereby incorporated by reference. A basic requirement of Type F equipment is that the work platform is suspended by at least four wire ropes and designed so that failure of any one wire rope will not substantially alter the normal position of the working platform. Another basic requirement of Type F equipment is that only one layer of hoisting rope is permitted on winding drums. Type F powered platforms may be either roof-powered or self-powered. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8511(d)2.)

(C) Powered platforms designated as Type T shall meet all the requirements in Part III of ANSI A120.1-1970, American National Standard Safety Requirements for Powered Platforms for Exterior Building Maintenance except for safety belts and safety lines, which are provided for in subparagraph (e) of this appendix. A basic requirement of Type T equipment is that the working platform is suspended by at least two wire ropes. Failure of one wire rope would not permit the working platform to fall to the ground, but would upset its normal position. The employer shall require employees working on Type T equipment to wear a safety belt or body harness as required by paragraph (e) of this appendix. Type T powered platforms may be either roof-lowered or self-powered. (Title 24. Part 2. Section 2-8511(d)3.)

(D) The requirements of this section apply to powered platforms with winding drum type hoisting machines. It is not the intent of this section to prohibit powered platforms using other types of hoisting machines, traction drum hoisting machines, air powered machines, hydraulic powered machines, and internal combustion machines. Installation of powered platforms with other types of hoisting machines is permitted, provided adequate protective devices are used, and provided reasonable safety of life and limb to users of the equipment and to others who may be exposed is assured. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8511-(c)2.)

(E) Both Type F and Type T powered platforms shall comply with the requirements of Appendix C of this standard.

(c) Type F Powered Platforms

(1) Roof Car, General.

(A) A roof car shall be provided whenever it is necessary to move the working platform horizontally to working or storage positions.

(B) The maximum rated speed at which a power traversed roof car may be moved in a horizontal direction shall be 50 feet per minute. (Title 24. Part 2. Section 2-8512(a).)

(2) Movement and Positioning of Roof Car.

(A) Provisions shall be made to protect against having the roof car leave the roof or enter roof areas not designed for travel.

(B) The horizontal motion of the roof cars shall be positively controlled so as to insure proper movement and positioning of the roof car.

(C) Roof car positioning devices shall be provided to insure that the working platform is placed and retained in proper position for vertical travel and during storage.

(D) Mechanical stops shall be provided to prevent the traversing of the roof car beyond its normal limits of travel. Such stops shall be capable of withstanding a force equal to 100 percent of the inertial effect of the roof car in motion with traversing power applied.

(E)1. The operating device of a power-operated roof car for traversing shall be located on the roof car, the working platform, or both, and shall be of the continuous pressure weatherproof electric type. If more than one operating device is provided, they shall be so arranged that traversing is possible only for one operating device at a time.

  1. The operating device shall be so connected that it is not operating until:
  2. The working platform is located at its uppermost position of travel and is not in contact with the building face or fixed vertical guides in the face of the building; and
  3. All protective devices and interlocks are in a position for traversing. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8512 (b).)

(3) Roof Car Stability. Roof car stability shall be determined by either subparagraph (c)(3)(A) or (B) of this appendix, whichever is greater.

(A) The roof car shall be continuously stable, considering overturning moment as determined by 125 percent rated load, plus maximum dead load and the prescribed wind loading.

(B) The roof car and its anchorages shall be capable of resisting accidental over-tensioning of the wire ropes suspending the working platform and this calculated value shall include the effect of one and one-half times the value. For this calculation, the simultaneous effect of one-half wind load shall be included, and the design stresses shall not exceed those referred to in subparagraph (b)(1) of this appendix.

(C) If the load on the motors is at any time in excess of three times that required for lifting the working platform with its rated load, the motor shall stall. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8512(c).)

(4) Access to the Roof Car. Safe access to the roof car and from the roof car to the working platform shall be provided. If the access to the roof car at any point of its travel is not over the roof area or where otherwise necessary for safety self- closing, self-locking gates shall be provided. Standard guardrails shall meet the provisions of Section 3209. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8512(d).)

(5) Means for Maintenance, Repair, and Storage. Means shall be provided to run the roof car away from the roof perimeter, where necessary, and to provide a safe area for maintenance, repairs, and storage, Provisions shall be made to secure the machine in the stored position. For stored machines subject to wind forces, see special design and anchorage requirements for “wind forces” in Part II, Section 10.5.1.1 of ANSI A120-l-1970, American National Standard Safety Requirements for Powered Platforms for Exterior Building Maintenance, in which is hereby incorporated by reference. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8512(e).)

(6) General Requirements for Working Platforms. The working platform shall be of girder or truss construction and shall be adequate to support its rated load under any position of loading, and comply with the provisions set forth in Section 10 of ANSI A120.1-1970, American National Standard Safety Requirements for Powered Platforms for Exterior Building Maintenance, which is hereby incorporated by reference.

(7) Load Rating Plate. Each working platform shall bear a manufacturer’s load rating plate, conspicuously posted, stating the maximum permissible rated load. Load rating plates shall be made of noncorrosive material and shall have letters and figures stamped, etched, or cast on the surface. The minimum height of the letters and figures shall be one-fourth inch.

(8) Minimum Size. The working platform shall have a minimum net width of 24 inches.

(9) Guardrails. Working platforms shall be furnished with permanent guard rails not less than 36 inches high, and not more than 42 inches high at the front (building side). At the rear, and on the sides, the rail shall not be less than 42 inches high. An intermediate guardrail shall be provided around the entire platform between the top guardrail and the toeboard.

(10) Toeboards. A 3 1/2-inch toeboard shall be provided alone all sides of the working platform.

(11) Open Spaces Between Guardrails and Toeboards. The spaces between the intermediate guardrail and platform toeboard on the building side of the working platform, and between the top guardrail and the toeboard on other sides of the platform, shall be filled with metallic mesh or similar material that will reject a ball one inch in diameter. The installed mesh shall be capable of withstanding a load of 100 pounds applied horizontally over any area of 144 square inches. If the space between the platform and the building face does not exceed eight inches, and the platform is restrained by guides, the mesh may be omitted on the front side.

(12) Flooring. The platform flooring shall be of the nonskid type, and if of open construction, shall reject a 9/16-inch diameter ball or be provided with a screen below the floor to reject a 9/16-inch diameter ball.

(13) Access Gates. Where access gates are provided, they shall be self-closing and self-locking.

(14) Operating Device for Vertical Movement of the Working Platform.

(A) The normal operating device for the working platform shall be located on the working platform and shall be of the continuous pressure weatherproof electric type.

(B) The operating device shall be operable only when all electrical protective devices and interlocks on the working platform are in position for normal service and, the roof car, if provided, is at an established operating point.

(15) Emergency Electric Operative Device.

(A) In addition, on roof-powered platforms, an emergency electric operating device shall be provided near the hoisting machine for use in the event of failure of the normal operating device for the working platform, or failure of the traveling cable system. The emergency operating device shall be mounted in a locked compartment and shall have a legend mounted thereon reading: “For Emergency Operation Only. Establish Communication With Personnel on Working Platform Before Use.”

(B) A key for unlocking the compartment housing the emergency operating device shall be mounted in a break-glass receptacle located near the emergency operating device.

(16) Manual Cranking for Emergency Operation. Emergency operation of the main drive machine may be provided to allow manual cranking. This Provision for manual operation shall be designed so that not more than two persons will be required to perform this operation. The access to this provision shall include a means to automatically make the machine inoperative electrically while under the emergency manual operation. The design shall be such that the emergency brake is operative at or below governor tripping speed during manual operation.

(17) Arrangement and Guarding of Hoisting Equipment.

(A) Hoisting equipment shall consist of a power-driven drum or drums contained in the roof car (roof-lowered platforms) or contained on the working platform (self-powered platform).

(B) The hoisting equipment shall be power-operated in both up and down directions.

(C) Guard or other protective devices shall be installed wherever rotating shafts or other mechanisms or gears may expose personnel to a hazard.

(D) Friction devices or clutches shall not be used for connecting the main driving mechanism to the drum or drums. Belt or chain-driven machines are prohibited.

(18) Hoisting Motors.

(A) Hoisting motors shall be electric and of weather-proof construction.

(B) Hoisting motors shall be in conformance with applicable provisions of subparagraph (c)(22) of this appendix, Electric Wiring and Equipment.

(C) Hoisting motors shall be directly connected to the hoisting machinery. Motor couplings, if used, shall be of steel construction.

(19) Brakes. The hoisting machines(s) shall have two independent braking means, each designed to stop and hold the working platform with 125 percent of rated load.

(20) Hoisting Ropes and Rope Connections.

(A) Working platforms shall be suspended by wire ropes of either 6 x 19 or 6 x 37 classification, preformed or nonpreformed.

(B) The minimum grade of the robe wire shall be improved plow steel. Ropes shall be fabricated of drawn galvanized or bright wire. Drawn galvanized wire rope shall be fabricated of individual wires on which the zinc coating has been applied at an intermediate size, and the wire then drawn to finished size and to the same tolerances and with the same mechanical properties as for uncoated wire of equal grade.

(C) The minimum factor of safety shall be 10, and shall be calculated by the following formula:

F = S x N/W

Where

S = Manufacturer’s rated breaking strength of one robe.

N = Number of ropes under load.

W = Maximum static load on all ropes with the platform and its rated load at any point of its travel.

(D) Hoisting ropes shall be sized to conform with the required factor of safety, but in no case shall the size be less than 5/16 inch diameter.

(E) Winding drums shall have at least three turns of robe remaining when the platform has landed at the lowest possible point of its travel.

(F) The lengthening or repairing of wire rope by the joining of two or move lengths is prohibited.

(G) The nondrum ends of the hoisting ropes shall be provided with individual shackle rods which will permit individual adjustment of rope lengths, if required.

(H) More than two reverse bends in each rope is prohibited.

(I) All cable connections used to support scaffold platforms shall be by means of factory attached swayed fittings or other method affording equivalent strength. Only safety type shackles shall be used.

(J) Wire winders, cable winders, baskets, or the equivalent, when used on suspended scaffolds, shall be so constructed as to prevent kinking of the wire rope (cable).

  1. The frame work shall be rigid enough to prevent distortion when stepped upon, if it is mounted upon the top of the working platform.
  2. The cable feeding device, if tubular, shall be flared to permit smooth passage of the cable through it.
  3. The feeding device shall be placed at a proper angle both vertically and horizontally so as to direct the cable into the storage area, wherein the greatest portion of the cable will store.

(21) Rope Tag Data.

(A) A metal data tag shall be securely attached to one of the wire rope fastenings. This data tag shall bear the following wire-rope data:

  1. The diameter in inches.
  2. Construction classification.
  3. Whether nonpreformed or preformed.
  4. The grade of material used.
  5. The manufacturer’s rated breaking-strength.
  6. Name of the manufacturer of the rope.
  7. The month and year the ropes were installed.

(22) Electrical Wiring and Equipment.

(A) All electrical equipment and wiring shall conform to the California Code of Regulations, Title 8, Electrical Safety Orders.

(B) All motors and operation and control equipment shall be supplied from a single power source.

(C) The power supply for the powered platform shall be an independent circuit supplied through a fused disconnect switch.

(D) Electrical conductor parts of the power supply system shall be protected against accidental contact.

(E) “Effective” electrical grounding shall be provided.

  1. Provisions for electrical grounding shall be included with the power-supply system.
  2. Controller cabinets, motor frames, hoisting machines, the working platform, roof car and roof car track system, and noncurrent carrying carts of electrical equipment, where provided, shall be grounded.
  3. The controller, where used, shall be so designed and installed that a single ground or short circuit will not prevent both the normal and final stopping device from stopping the working platform.
  4. Means shall be provided on the roof car and working platform for grounding portable electric tools.
  5. The working platform shall be grounded through a grounding connection in a traveling cable. Electrically powered tools utilized on the working platform shall be grounded.

(F) Electrical receptacles located on the roof or other exterior location shall be of a weatherproof type and shall be located so as not to be subject to contact with water or accumulated snow. The receptacles shall be grounded and the electric cable shall include a grounding conductor. The receptacle and plug shall be a type designed to avoid hazard to persons inserting or withdrawing the plug. Provision shall be made to prevent application of cable strain directly to the plug and receptacle.

(G) Electric runway conductor systems shall be of the type designed for use in exterior locations and shall be located so as not to be subject to contact with water or accumulated snow. The conductors, collectors, and disconnecting means shall conform to the requirements of the California Code of Regulations, Title 8, Electrical Safety Orders. A grounded conductor shall parallel the power conductors and be so connected that it cannot be opened by the disconnecting means. The system shall be designed to avoid hazard to persons in the area.

(H) Electrical protective devices and interlocks of the weatherproof type shall be provided.

(I) Where the installation includes a roof car, electric contact(s) shall be provided and so connected that the operating devices for the working platform shall be operative only when the roof car is located and mechanically retained at an established operating point.

(J) Where the powered platform includes a power-operated roof car, the operating device for the roof car shall be inoperative when the roof car is mechanically retained at an established operating point.

(K) An electric contact shall be provided and so connected that it will cause the down direction relay for vertical travel to open if the tension in the traveling cable exceeds safe limits.

(L) An automatic overload device shall be provided to cut off the electrical power to the circuit in all hoisting motors for travel in the up direction, should the load applied to the hoisting ropes at either end of the working platform exceed 125 percent of its normal tension with rated load, as shown on the manufacturer’s data plate on the working platform.

(M) An automatic device shall be provided for each hoisting rope which will cut off the electrical power to the hoisting motor or motors in the down direction and apply the brakes if any hoisting rope becomes slack.

(N) Upper and lower directional limit devices shall be provided to prevent the travel of the working platform beyond the normal upper and lower limits of travel.

(Q) Operation of a directional limit device shall prevent further motion in the appropriate direction, if the normal limit of travel has been reached.

(P) Directional limit devices, if driven from the hoisting machine by chains, tapes, or cables, shall incorporate a device to disconnect the electric bower from the hoisting machine and apply both the primary and secondary brakes in the event of failure of the driving means.

(Q) Final terminal stopping devices of the working platform:

  1. Final terminal stopping devices for the working platform shall be provided as a secondary means of preventing the working platform from over-traveling at the terminals.
  2. The device shall be set to function as close to each terminal landing as practical, but in such a way that under normal operating conditions it will not function when the working platform is stopped by the normal terminal stopping device.
  3. Operation of the final terminal stopping device shall open the potential relay for vertical travel, thereby disconnecting the electric power from the hoisting machine, and applying both the primary and secondary brakes.
  4. The final terminal stopping device for the upper limit of travel shall be mounted so that it is operated directly by the motion of the working platform itself.

(R) Emergency stop switches shall be provided in or adjacent to each operating device.

(S) Emergency stop switches shall:

  1. Have red operating buttons or handles.
  2. Be conspicuously and permanently marked “Stop.”
  3. Be the manually opened and manually closed type.
  4. Be positively opened with the opening not solely dependent on springs.

(T) The manual operation of an emergency stop switch associated with an operating device for the working platform shall open the potential relay for vertical travel, thereby disconnecting the electric power from the hoisting machine and applying both the primary and secondary brakes.

(U) The manual operation of the emergency stop switch associated with the operating device for a power-driven roof car shall cause the electrical power to the traverse machine to be interrupted, and the traverse machine brake to apply. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8512(f).)

(23) Requirements for Emergency Communications.

(A) Communication equipment shall be provided for each powered platform for use in an emergency.

(B) Two-way communication shall be established between personnel on the roof and personnel on the stalled working platform before any emergency operation of the working platform is undertaken by personnel on the roof.

(C) The equipment shall permit two-way voice communication between the working platform and

  1. Designated personnel continuously available while the powered platform is in use; and
  2. Designated personnel on roof-powered platforms, undertaking emergency operation of the working platform by means of the emergency operating device located near the hoisting machine.

(D) The emergency communication equipment shall be one of the following types:

  1. Telephone connected to the central telephone exchange system; or
  2. Telephones on a limited system or an approved two-way radio system, provided designated personnel are available to receive a message during the time the powered platform is in use. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8512(g).).

(d) Type T Powered Platform (1) Roof Car. The requirements of subparagraphs (c)(l) through (c)(5) of this appendix shall apply to Type T powered platforms.

(2) Working Platform. The requirements of subparagraphs (c)(6) through (c)(16) of this appendix apply to Type T powered platforms.

(A) The working platform shall be suspended, by at least two wire ropes.

(B) The maximum rated speed at which the working platform of self-powered platforms may be moved in a vertical direction shall not exceed 35 feet per minute.

(C) Each powered platform shall be provide with a horizontal safety line.

(3) Hoisting Equipment. The requirements of subparagraphs (c)(17) and (18) of this appendix shall apply to Type T powered platforms.

(4) Brakes. Brakes requirements of subparagraph (c)(19) of this appendix shall apply.

(5) Hoisting Ropes and Rope Connections.

(A) Subparagraphs (c)(20)(A) through (F) and (H) of this appendix shall apply to Type T power platforms.

(B) Adjustable shackle rods in subparagraph (c)(20)(G) of this appendix shall apply to Type T powered platforms, if the working platform is suspended by more than two wire ropes.

(6) Electrical Wiring and Equipment.

(A) The reguirements of subparagraphs (c)(22)(A) through (F) of this appendix shall apply to Type T powered platforms. “Circuit protection limitation,” “powered platform electrical service system,” all operating services and control eguipment shall comply with the specifications contained in the California Code of Regulations, Title 8, Electrical Safety Orders.

(B) For electrical protective devices, the requirements of subparagraphs (c)(22)(G) through (P) shall apply to Type T platforms. Requirements for the “circuit potential limitation” shall be in accordance with the specifications contained in the California Code of Regulations, Title 8, Electrical Safety Orders.

(7) Emergency Communications. All the requirements of subparagraph (c)(23) of this appendix shall apply to Type T powered platforms. (Title 24, Part 2, Section 2-8513).

(e) Safety Belts and Safety Lines.

(1) Each employee on the working platform of Type T powered platforms shall be provided with and required to use a body harness or safety belt attached to a vertical or horizontal safety line, If a horizontal safety line (dog line) is used the length of the lanyard shall not exceed 5 feet and shall employ an energy absorbing device acceptable to the Division.

(2) Body harnesses or safety belts, lines and other components, including fastening means and anchorages to the working platform shall conform with applicable provisions of Appendix C.

NOTE: Authority cited: Section 142.3, Labor Code. Reference: Section l42.3, Labor Code; and Section 18943(c), Health and Safety Code.

https://www.dir.ca.gov/title8/sb7g1a6.html

 

HSG is compliant with all CDC, OSHA, State Guidelines and Applicable Laws of Covid-19. HSG Employees have been trained, and provided the necessary PPE tools to ensure the safety of all.  It is a top priority of HSG to maintain a safe work environment at all times and throughout the current crisis.